Hot Shot! Treasury Secretary Jack Lew Heads to Hamilton

first_img from $149.00 Related Shows View Comments Hamilton It takes one to know one! On August 26, Hamilton star Lin-Manuel Miranda welcomed a special guest backstage: Treasury Secretary Jack Lew. If that seems a little less exciting than J.Lo, Zachary Quinto, Stephen Colbert or even the Veep, you might be missing an important fact. Secretary Lew probably wouldn’t have his current job without Alexander Hamilton. After all, the 10-dollar Founding Father was the very first Secretary of the Treasury. Now that the government honcho has seen the hip-hop musical celebrating his predecessor, perhaps he’ll rethink that redesign. last_img

The Public’s Sweat & Party People Extend

first_img View Comments Off-Broadway’s Sweat and Party People have been extended at the Public Theater! Lynn Nottage’s Sweat will now run an additional week through December 4, while Party People is scheduled to play through December 11.Sweat begins previews on October 18, with an opening night set for November 3. The drama stars Tony nominee Johanna Day and Younger favorite Miriam Shor. Directed by Kate Whoriskey, Sweat tells the story of a group of friends who have spent their lives sharing drinks, secrets and laughs while working together on the line of a factory floor. But when layoffs and picket lines begin to chip away at their trust, the friends find themselves pitted against each other in the hard fight to stay afloat.Scheduled to start performances on November 1, Party People will open on November 14. Helmed by Eclipsed director Liesl Tommy, old wounds and generational divides collide in this multi-media theatrical event about the price of being a revolutionary, and what it means for those who come after. Public Theaterlast_img read more

National Consumer Protection Week 2011: AG warns Vermonters about fraud

first_imgIn recognition of National Consumer Protection Week and in response to ongoing Vermont consumer complaints, Attorney General William H Sorrell warns consumers to be wary of frauds and scams that use wire transfer services, debt consolidators, and threatening collection calls all intended to take money from Vermonters.Fraud”Through a variety of means – posing as family or friends in distress, classified ads, bogus lottery and sweepstakes prize notices, and phony job offers – scammers use creative ways to get consumers to send them money by wire ransfer. We all need to know, and to make sure our loved ones know, that wire transfers are a key tool for scammers to get your hard-earned money. Vermonters should consider suspicious and possibly fraudulent, any unanticipated requests for funds by wire transfer.”How can you tell if it’s fraud?Did you get a call or e-mail from a family member in distress?- In recent months, Vermont consumers have lost tens of thousands of dollars to this scam. The consumer received a call from someone who sounded just like a family member, calling in distress while supposedly travelling and in need of emergency funds. The consumer may be told the family member has been arrested or mugged and lost all their money. The consumer is asked not to report it to other family members. If you receive a call or e-mail from a family member or friend requesting money be sent by wire transfer-STOP and contact another family member or friend to verify whether that the person is actually travelling, or contact the Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program for assistance.Did you get a check or money order in the mail?- Vermont consumers have also lost substantial funds to scammers after receiving what appeared to be a valid check or money order with instructions to deposit it, and then return some of the funds by wire transfer. Whether the check is an “advance on winnings”, “payment” for “mystery shopper” services, an overpayment for an item you are selling, or any other similar circumstance, the check always comes back as fake. Many of these fake checks can take weeks to come back as fake or drawn on accounts with no funds, but in every instance, the bank will require the consumer to pay back the money.Have you responded to an internet ad for an apartment rental?- Recently, Vermonters have also lost money to scammers offering a Vermont apartment or vacation property for rent. The scammer requests the consumer to send the security deposit by wire transfer. Scammers copy real estate listings and pose as absentee landlords, then “approve” the consumer for the “lease” and request an application fee or security deposit by wire. By the time the consumer learns that the property is bogus or they sent the money to someone that does not own the property, the money is gone. Check with local housing authorities regarding the existence of the actual property and establish the owner.What can you do if you have been targeted?Cease all contact with the scammer- If you have been targeted by a scammer, do not continue contact with the scammer.Stop or report any wire transfer of funds- If you have sent funds by wire transfer, contact the wire transfer company immediately to report the fraud and halt the transaction. If you are able to report it before the money is picked up, you may be able to stop the transaction. Unfortunately, in most cases once the scammer has the transaction reference number, the funds are collected within minutes.Contact authorities- Contact your local police to report the fraud, as well as the Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program (CAP). CAP tracks wire transfer fraud reports and uses the information in its efforts to work with wire transfer companies to combat wire transfer fraud.Know how to spot a fraud- Wire transfer fraud is difficult to investigate, as the funds can often be picked up at any location and the scammers are often out of the country. Vermonters’ best defense against this predatory activity is to understand and avoid these scams altogether. Collection ThreatsSorrell is cautioning Vermonters to be wary of fake collection calls that threaten consumers with dire consequences for failing to pay on a supposed debt. “These calls violate Vermont law. Collection agents may not threaten arrest, garnishments of wages, loss of personal property or other consequences they cannot enforce without a court order,” says Sorrell. Many of the calls claim to be collecting on an unpaid “payday” or short-term loan. In some cases, consumers had received short term loans, but had paid them in full. Payday loans are unlawful in Vermont, as the interest rates far exceed the rates allowable under Vermont banking law.What you can do if you are targeted by shady collectors:Don’t engage with the caller: The hostile and threatening tactics employed by these callers is intended to scare you into paying. Politely request information in writing and end the call. DO NOT make payment arrangements or agree to terms over the telephone, as such agreements are difficult to prove or enforce.Do not provide or verify any personal information: Do not give or verify your social security number, bank account information or date of birth, even if it appears the caller may know the information. Do not acknowledge you may owe a debt. Request the information be sent to you ‘ the caller should have your address and then end the call.Request information on the debt and the collection agency: Under debt collection practices law, you have the right to know the full name and contact information for any collection agency that contacts you, as well as to request proof of the debt in writing.Respond in writing to any written notification of a debt: If a collection agency sends you a notice in writing that you have a debt, but does not provide the specifics of the debt, respond in writing and request all the information about the debt be sent to you, including a copy of their right to collect the debt. Do not verify any personal information. Send your response by certified or registered mail. Under debt collection practices law, the collection agency must furnish proof in writing that you owe the debt upon your request and provide their authority to collect on the debt, or cease collection of the debt.Tell the collection agency how they may contact you: You have the right to request that any collection agency contact you only in the manner that you choose (such as by mail or through your attorney), or not contact you at all (called a cease-contact request). Your request must be in writing and should be sent by certified or registered mail so you have proof of receipt.Report harassing, threatening or bogus collection calls: If you receive bogus, threatening or harassing calls, you may report the calls to authorities. Violations of fair debt collection practices laws can be reported to the Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program. You may find more information about your debt collection rights or file a complaint online (www.uvm.edu/consumer(link is external)) or contact CAP by phone toll free in Vermont at (800) 649-2424 or (802) 656-3183. Threats of physical harm should be immediately reported to your local law enforcement agency. Free OfferSorrell is also reminding Vermonters to be wary of free trial offers because often they contain hidden fees and other subscription obligations. Attached to promotions from online merchants or associated with health-related or other products advertised on television and in print media, these free trial offers usually include inflated shipping or handling charges and an automatic subscription and monthly charge if the consumer does not cancel. “Companies hide recurring fees behind free trial offers and make cancelling membership plans hard in the hopes that consumers will forget or give up. They then continue to charge consumers monthly for services and products they don’t need or want,” says Sorrell. When consumers finally cancel they may be charged cancellation or restocking fees. Many consumers may miss the small monthly charges on their credit card, checking account or telephone statements.Protect yourself from hidden fees and recurring charges:Avoid or be wary of free trial offers and other similar promotions- Read the disclosure! Often by clicking YES, you are agreeing for your credit card number and other personal information to be forwarded to a promotion company running the free offer. Free trials, discount codes at the checkout of online merchants and low-cost initial purchases are all tricks used to get consumers to agree to something in the hope of saving money. Read the fine print, decline the promotional offers or get good information first about what it will take to cancel or stop any membership. Know where your financial information is going.Review your bank account, credit card and telephone statements carefully- Companies rely on the fact that many consumers do not review their statements line by line, and will likely miss a small charge. Small charges add up quickly over time and it is the consumer who is responsible for monitoring their statements.Dispute unauthorized charges right away- You are often able to contest a charge on your bill, but only within a certain amount of time. Contact your bank, credit card company or telephone service provider as soon as you notice a questionable charge and request that it be removed. You may have to provide some additional information, but in some cases these charges can be reversed if caught soon enough.Home Improvement FraudWith spring just around the corner, Attorney General Sorrell is advising Vermonters to choose contractors carefully for their home improvement projects. “Home improvement fraud strikes at what is, for most people, your biggest investment – your home,” says Sorrell. Contractors are not generally required to be licensed in Vermont, so Sorrell advises Vermont consumers to “be diligent about asking for references, getting recommendations from friends, and insisting on seeing bond or insurance information before you sign the contract.” Home improvement fraud costs Vermonters thousands of dollars each year, according to complaint records from the Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program. Home improvement fraud is a crime in Vermont.Protect against home improvement fraud:Get recommendations and check references- If you are looking to hire a contractor, talk to friends, neighbors, colleagues and other people you trust and get recommendations of who they have used. Ask any potential contractor for several references and contact those references. Ask questions about the contractor’s work quality, timeliness and ability to stick to a budget. Find out if there were any billing or cost issues, and how those were resolved.Write a detailed work plan as part of your contract- One of the best protections you can have is a detailed plan of the work and the cost of items. Tie payment to clear, objective goals in the contract that can be easily determined. Be clear about what remedy you can seek if the contractor fails to meet the terms of the contract, and what, if any, warranty is offered on the work.Get complete and thorough information from your contractor- Believe it or not, many consumers hire a contractor, only to realize they have very little information about how to contact the contractor when a problem arises. Require the full name, address and telephone numbers for the business and the individual contractor. Ask for the name, contact information and policy number for the contractor’s liability insurance company, and verify that the policy is still active.Check complaint histories- Before you hire a contractor, contact theConsumer Assistance Program to get the complaint history for the contractor, and check the State Home Improvement Fraud Registry.Having trouble resolving unauthorized charges? Contact CAP for help!Contact the Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program (CAP) toll free in Vermont with questions at (800) 649-2424 or (802) 656-3183, or visit CAP on the web atwww.uvm.edu/consumer(link is external) for more information or to file a complaint.center_img Debt ScamSorrell is warning Vermonters about companies that are preying upon Vermonters in financial distress by offering useless or non-existent “assistance” with settling credit card debt or rescuing mortgages in foreclosure. “Many companies marketing these services to Vermonters are not licensed in Vermont and perform little or no meaningful service for the thousands of dollars they charge,” Sorrell said. “While our office has aggressively pursued the unlicensed companies we learn about, many more are in contact with Vermonters each day. If you are seeking assistance with managing your debts or mortgage, make sure you are doing business with a company licensed in Vermont.”Consumers should be wary of companies that make big promises, but want payment up front for their services. Claims such as “settle your debt for half of what you owe” or “rescue your home from foreclosure” are rarely substantiated and occasionally completely false. Some companies may never contact creditors at all.What you can do to protect yourself:Verify licensure- Companies providing debt management or mortgage assistance services in Vermont need to be licensed by the Vermont Department of Banking in order to provide services to Vermont consumers. You can check to see if a company is licensed in Vermont online at the Vermont Department of Banking website, or by calling toll free at (888) 568-4547.Decline payment up front- insist on paying only when you have proof the company is in fact working on your behalf.Seek local assistance- Local agencies, such as the non-profit Consumer Credit Counseling Service of New Hampshire and Vermont and the Vermont Department of Banking’s Mortgage Assistance Program, are resources that can help you understand and begin to manage your debts.Contact CAP- The Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program (CAP) can help you recognize the red flags before you send any money away. Contact CAP to check complaint histories for a business or with any questions you may have. You can reach CAP toll free in Vermont at (800) 649-2424, or at (802) 656-3183, visit CAP on the web at www.uvm.edu/consumer(link is external).last_img read more

U.S. Solar Makes Up Majority of New Electricity Generation for the First Time

first_imgU.S. Solar Makes Up Majority of New Electricity Generation for the First Time FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Chris Martin for Bloomberg News:The U.S. solar industry had a record first quarter, accounting for the majority of new power generation for the first time.The 1,665 megawatts of solar power that came online in the first three months of the year represented 64 percent of new capacity, and wind provided 33 percent, analysts at GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association said in a statement Thursday.The U.S. solar industry will add 14.5 gigawatts this year, mainly with large utility-scale power plants, almost double the 7.5 gigawatts installed last year. Residential rooftops reached 1 million homes this year and will add another 1 million within two years, said Tom Kimbis, interim director of the Washington-based trade group.“The solar industry is growing at warp speed, driven by the fact that solar is one of the lowest-cost options for electricity,” Kimbis said in the statement.Full article: Solar Makes Up Most of New U.S. Power Capacity for First Timelast_img read more

Island Park Home Invasion Victim Tied Up, Shot

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police are investigating an Island Park home invasion in which two masked gunmen shot a man they had tied up along with a woman on Wednesday night.The man and woman were inside the man’s Industrial Place home on Barnum Island when two men armed with handguns tied up the victims using zip ties and demanded money and jewelry at 10:15 p.m., police said.One of the gunmen then fired a shot, hitting the man in his leg, police said. The victim was later treated at the scene.The assailants fled in the victim’s vehicle with cash and jewelry.  Police recovered the vehicle nearby.The suspects were described as 20-30 years old, medium height and build. They were wearing black ski masks, blue jeans and dark jackets. They were last seen running northbound on Audubon Boulevard.Fourth Squad detectives ask anyone with information about this crime to contact Nassau County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS.  All callers will remain anonymous.last_img read more

Cops Searching Lake Ronkonkoma Recover Kayak, But Man Still Missing

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The kayak belonging to a man who went missing in Lake Ronkonkoma Thursday afternoon has been recovered, police said, but the search for the kayaker will have to continue Saturday after authorities suspended the operation for the day. A Suffolk County police spokeswoman didn’t know when or where the kayak was recovered. She said the search will resume again Saturday, but it was unclear what time police would head back into the water. Police have been searching Lake Ronkonkoma since a 911 caller reported a distressed kayaker in the lake around 3:30 p.m. Thursday, police said. The man was calling for help, witnesses told police. Good Samaritans attempted to help but eventually lost sight of him, police said. The search was suspended Thursday due to darkness. It resumed again Friday morning. The police spokeswoman added Friday that authorities “believe” they have the identity of the person they’re looking for. Police have yet to publicly identify the kayaker. Officers from the Suffolk County Marine Bureau, Emergency Service Section, Aviation Section and Parks police have been involved in the search. Several fire departments have also assisted.last_img read more

Safe bet? Sovereign funds rethink once-reliable real estate

first_imgThe nature of property investments is also shifting, with funds increasingly investing in logistics space, such as warehousing, amid a boom in online commerce during the pandemic, while cutting back on deals for offices and retail buildings.Read also: Residential property sales, prices rise cool as pandemic hits economySuch shifts in behavior can have seismic effects on the global real estate market, given such funds are among the largest investors in property and have interests worth hundreds of billions of dollars in total. Three sovereign funds sit within the top 10 largest real estate investors, according to market specialists IPE Real Assets.A big question is whether the changes are structural for the funds, for which property is an asset-class staple at about 8 percent of their total portfolios on average, or a temporary response to a huge, unexpected and unfamiliar global event. “Real estate is still a big part of sovereign wealth fund portfolios and will continue to be so,” said Diego López, managing director of Global SWF and a former sovereign wealth fund adviser at PwC.“What COVID has accelerated is the sophistication of SWFs trying to build diversification and resilience into their portfolio – and hence looking for other asset classes and industries.”Sovereign funds have been more bearish on property than public pension funds, another big investor in the sector, Global SWF found. While they have outstripped the pension funds in overall investment across most industries and assets this year, by two to one, that ratio is reversed for real estate.Future of the office Funds are nursing hits to their existing property portfolios stemming from the introduction of lockdowns and social-distancing restrictions. While other parts of their portfolio, such as stocks and bonds, have rebounded from March’s trough, a real-estate recovery is less assured.Property capital value globally is expected to drop by 14 percent in 2020 before rising by 3.4 percent in 2021, according to commercial real estate services group CBRE. Analysts and academics question whether the pandemic’s impact may prove long-lasting, with more people working from home and shopping online.Read also: ‘We are dying’: No new shopping center openings, leasing grinds to halt“I think there’s a real threat to some commercial business districts in the big cities as I can’t see us all return to the 9-to-5 schlep in, schlep out,” said Yolande Barnes, a real-estate specialist at London university UCL.The value of property assets of some funds has fallen in 2020, with those experiencing the biggest drops including Singapore’s Temasek Holdings and GIC, Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA) and Qatar Investment Authority (QIA), according to data compiled for Reuters by industry tracker Preqin.Those four funds have collectively seen the value of such assets drop by $18.1 billion to $132.9 billion, the data showed.Reuters was unable to confirm whether the fall was due to lower valuations or asset sales. The funds either declined to comment or did not respond.Many sovereign funds do not publicly disclose data on property investments, with Norway’s one of the exceptions.The Norwegian fund, which has around $49 billion invested in real estate, up from $47 billion at the end of 2019, said last week its unlisted property portfolio returned minus 1.6 percent in the first half of 2020.Sovereign funds have also largely steered clear in 2020 of new direct investments in London or Los Angeles, hotspots in normal times, according to property services firm Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL), which said SWFs were “on the defensive”.Logistics and biotechThe funds’ advance in logistics properties, such as warehousing and goods distribution centers, comes at a time of high demand as people have bought everything from toilet paper to trainers from home during lockdowns.So far this year, logistics have accounted for about 22 percent of funds’ real-estate investments by value, compared with 15 percent in 2019 as a whole, the Global SWF data shows.Meanwhile, investments in offices have fallen to 36 percent from 49 percent last year, and in retail property to zero versus 15 percent.Read also: Millennials fail to benefit from slower rise in house pricesMarcus Frampton, chief investment officer at the Alaska Permanent Fund Corporation (APFC), told Reuters that real-estate deal volumes had “slowed down substantially” in general, but that, anecdotally, he saw activity in industrial facilities like logistics and “multi-family” apartment blocks.The wealth fund’s holdings have risen to $4.7 billion, up from $4 billion at the end of June, after the purchase of multi-family and industrial REIT stocks on July 1, Frampton said.“Commercial warehouse activity is strong,” he added.In a sign of the times, Temasek participated in a $500 million investment in Indonesia-based e-commerce firm Tokopedia in June.In contrast, physical retail, a significant part of many funds’ holdings, has been hit hard. QIA-owned luxury retailer Harrods in London has reportedly forecast a 45 percent plunge in annual sales, as visitor numbers plummet. Many other retailers have sought to renegotiate rents.The outlook appears brighter for some fledgling sectors such as biotech, which has come to the fore during the pandemic.“We have seen significant demand for life sciences space. That’s ranged from office to specialist lab and warehouse space,” said Alistair Meadows, JLL’s head of UK capital markets.Distressed opportunitiesThe United States office market is expected to face its first year since 2009 of more space becoming vacant than leased, according to CBRE.Still, investors are betting on a rebound of sorts in some quarters. For example, Canary Wharf Group, partly owned by the QIA, unveiled plans last month for a large new mixed-use development, including business space, in London’s financial district.And while hotels face huge challenges, occupancy rates are expected to rebound near to pre-COVID levels – but not until the end of 2021.Read also: Property market to bounce back next year: MarkPlusThe Libyan Investment Authority has experienced problems with the operating expenses of some of its properties, including some hotels in Africa owned by its subsidiary, Chairman Ali Mahmoud Hassan Mohamed told Reuters.But it remains committed to its real-estate portfolio, estimated at $6.6 billion in its latest valuation in 2012, as it was able to restore its value, he said.Crises can also present opportunities, however.In the aftermath of the pandemic, some funds may look for bargains as distressed properties emerge.The Hong Kong Monetary Authority, which operates a fund, told Reuters it would “closely monitor market conditions with a view to capturing appropriate opportunities”.And in an uncertain world, some academics argue that property remains a solid bet for savvy investors.Barnes of UCL said sovereign funds could be “lighter on their feet” than some other institutional funds and more able to adjust their behaviour to suit changing circumstances.“Real estate is one of the better sectors to be in, in a world of turmoil,” she added. “But it’s very much about picking the right real estate.”Topics : The COVID-19 pandemic has forced sovereign wealth funds to think the previously unthinkable.With prime office blocks lying empty around the world, hotels half-vacant and retailers struggling to stay afloat, the funds are retreating from many of the real estate investments that have long been a mainstay of their strategies.Sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) invested US$4.4 billion in the sector in the first seven months of 2020, 65 percent down from the same period a year ago, according to previously unpublished data provided to Reuters by Global SWF, an industry data specialist.last_img read more

Builder secures beachside site for $10M townhouse project

first_imgAn impression of Arenna, a boutique townhouse development proposed for Kamala Crescent, Casuarina.A prime parcel of beachside real estate on the NSW Tweed Coast has sold to a Gold Coast builder who plans to deliver a $10 million boutique townhouse project on the site.Hipmar Group, trading as Hipwood Design & Construct, paid $3 million for the 2.372ha site in Casuarina in an off-market deal finalised last Thursday. A prime land parcel 45-47 Kamala Crescent, Casuarina has sold for $3 million.The block, at 45-47 Kamala Crescent, was sold by Brisbane developer EkkoPoint Properties who acquired the parcel as part of a 2008 land transfer and planned to develop the site. Selling agent Nick Witheriff of LJ Hooker Kingscliff said the sale price marks a high point for the area and a positive boost for local industry.“It was attractive for the seller because he was able to achieve what is the highest price for a block of that size on the Tweed Coast in 10 years,” he said.“The local builder moved quickly to secure the site because he has all of the local expertise in dealing with council and the approvals process to deliver that project.” MORE: Middle of the market set to lead post COVID-19 sales Could this be Australia’s best house The proposed Arenna development is 100m from Casuarina Beach.Based in Burleigh Heads, Hipwood Design & Construct is led by Troy Hipwood who lives in Casuarina and has family living on Kamala Crescent.It is understood Mr Hipwood was motivated to secure the site after having witnessed the frenzy of interest in the proposed townhouses.An application is before Tweed Shire Council for Arenna, a boutique building comprised of nine townhouses in a project worth approximately $10 million for the land and build.center_img The nine Arenna townhouses boasts a modern, sleek design.Six of the nine townhouses were pre-sold by the LJ Hooker Kingscliff team in the past eight weeks, another is under contract and the final two – Houses 4 and 8 – are on the market.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa7 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day agoLocated 100m from Casuarina Beach, the townhouses range in price from $829,000 (three bedrooms) to $1.099 million (four bedrooms) and boast modern, sleek finishes. “We had gone to market earlier this year with a townhouse concept on that site and we’ve sold more than 50 per cent before any approvals were in place,” Mr Witheriff said. Six of the nine townhouses have sold prior to development approval.Mr Witheriff said demand was driven by owner-occupiers drawn to the region by massive investment in infrastructure, including the Tweed Valley Hospital which is due for completion in 2023.“The Tweed Coast is experiencing increased growth off the back of all of the new amenity which is creating opportunities for people to live long-term in this region,” he said.“We have a lack of good quality new housing and land available on the Tweed Coast so buyers are moving quickly to secure that stock when it becomes available.” Plans for Arenna are expected to be approved by July with construction to commence immediately. RELATED: Global interest in glamping resort site Couple spends $1.45m on unit they’ve never seenlast_img read more

Dillsboro man killed in Hamilton County motorcycle crash

first_imgWhitewater Township, Oh. — A Dillsboro man has been identified as the victim of a Wednesday motorcycle crash in Whitewater Township, Ohio.Deputies from the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department say, Robert Cogswell, 56, was passing slow traffic on the westbound I-74 ramp to southbound I-275 around 6 p.m. when he drove off the right side of the road. Cogswell lost control and was thrown from the bike and pronounced deceased at the scene.Cogswell was not wearing a helmet. Alcohol or drugs are not suspected but speed could have been a factor.last_img