Stylish and spacious contemporary Carindale residence next to park awaits modern family

first_img21 Kenilworth Place, Carindale.This residence at 21 Kenilworth Place, Carindale, promotes family living with its three-tiered floorplan, creating distinct levels with inviting outdoor and indoor areas. There is a stately facade while on the inside, luxurious finishes have been created by interior designers. 21 Kenilworth Place, Carindale.A pathway runs between pillars and tropical gardens to the handmade timber front door, which grants entry into a chandeliered foyer on the first level. A carpeted office with side entry sits to the foyer’s left, while the three-car garage with storage closets resides on the right. Vitrified floor tiles flow up a grand staircase under 3m ceilings, passing a second hallway with an adjacent bathroom. 21 Kenilworth Place, Carindale.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020They continue into the second level’s sprawling living and dining room with down lighting, an ornate chandelier and square-cut cornices.The adjoining kitchen’s granite benchtops overlook this living area, complemented by a double sink, generous cabinetry and high-quality appliances, including induction cooktop with an extra-wide oven. A soundproofed family room is found on the kitchen’s opposite side, complete with a surround sound system and mirrored bar boasting sink, shelving and bar fridge. 21 Kenilworth Place, Carindale.Sliding glass doors lead from the living and dining room out to a covered pavilion with a soaring timber ceiling, resort-style fan and outdoor kitchen with gas barbecue. It overlooks a pool with glass fencing and a sandstone waterfall. A bedroom with access to an outdoor sitting area with an electronic awning is on the middle level while four bedrooms and a bathroom are on the top level. Three bedrooms have large windows and built-in wardrobes, while the main bedroom boasts a walk-in wardrobe, Juliette balcony and ensuite with rain shower and stone-topped double vanity. 21 Kenilworth Place, Carindale.The residence also has 4500L of tank water, tinted glass and ducted airconditioning. It is nestled on the edge of Ablington Way Park, five minutes’ drive from Westfield Carindale.Agent Patti Steele called this residence a timeless haven of natural light, space and privacy.“This home caters to every family member with its impeccable appointments, spacious bedrooms and separate living areas,” she said. BSInspections: Today, 11-11.45amAuction: On site, Sept 2, 11amAgent: Patti Steele, Harcourts Homesidelast_img read more

Purdue: Fast Start program offers opportunity, savings

first_imgLAFAYETTE, Ind.  —  Fast Start, created by Purdue in partnership with the philanthropic online learning program Modern States, is designed to help Indiana high school students earn access to up to a year of college credit through free online courses and the corresponding College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exams.Students receive assured admission into Purdue if they complete five courses, pass the corresponding CLEP exams and meet the University’s standard admissions requirements.“Every promising Indiana student deserves the opportunity to pursue an affordable, world-class education. With its new Fast Start program, which could easily save Indiana families thousands of dollars, Purdue University has taken yet another step toward making this possible,” the press release stated.Learn more about the program here.last_img read more

SU repeats poor penalty performance against Maine with flag-riddled 1st half

first_imgAfter thinking about it for four awkward, silent seconds, Nick Provo provided a carbon copy of his first response. Why did he feel Syracuse committed 10 first half penalties? How did, and how will SU get that penalty problem out of its ‘system?’ ‘You just got to make plays,’ Provo said. ‘Penalties happen. You just have to get them out of your system.’ They just happen. Saturday, they just happened. At an alarming rate in the first half for the Orange. The fourteen penalties in total, the most for a Big East team this year, coming against an FCS team in Maine was because of, well, nothing in particular. Penalties happen. There it was: the repetition when it came to his answer to SU’s penalty problem for Provo. Repetition with his words coming after a 38-14 win where the Orange repeated its poor penalty performance for the second straight year against the Black Bears, yielding only a 17-14 SU lead at halftime. In 2009, SU committed its most penalties on the year with 10 against Maine. SU head coach Doug Marrone attributed the performance to the obvious, a failure to focus.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text ‘Penalties? What do I assess them to?’ Marrone said. ‘A lack of focus.’ Added Marrone: ‘The only thing that I would say bothered me the most was the penalties.’ It was a repeat performance of flailing yellow flags and piercing whistles in the Carrier Dome, most of it sprinkled throughout the first 30 minutes. After one quarter, the offense had run just two more plays than offensive and defensive penalties committed (six to four). At the half, the Orange had amassed those 10 penalties, just five shy of the total penalties for the team heading into the game. Ten penalties, just shy of one-fifth of the total the Orange committed all of last year. Ten penalties in 58 total first half plays. A 17 percent chance of committing a penalty per snap. The percentage was not one Marrone was OK with. Heading into the game, Marrone had a very similar percentage on his mind as well. A percentage just one number off. On SU’s statistical chart, it says that a team has a 16 percent chance in winning when committing two turnovers a game, the number SU averaged in its first two games. Poor percentages are something no coach, including Marrone, wants to wrestle with. Marrone said he also isn’t one who wants to wrestle with a ‘Here we go again’ mindset. When down in the first half, Marrone said the thought of déjà vu never crept into his mind. He doesn’t act that way. He made that clear, once again, in his postgame press conference. And at halftime, he made it clear to his team that the game was in their control. No overbearing mention of the penalties. No halftime meltdown or show in order to get his players to stay disciplined. Penalties happen. ‘I told them we were winning the football game, and that we had momentum on our side,’ Marrone said. ‘We need to take this first drive and go down the field and score. And we need to play and we don’t need to worry about, ‘What happens if they do this, what happens if they do that?’ Let’s just go out and play.’ Following the game, Marrone rattled off a slew of things Maine did to perhaps throw SU off and commit the penalties. There was Maine’s inverted weak safety negating SU’s weak-side running game. There was the bringing down of the Black Bears’ strong safety. There was the ‘two-trap.’ There was the three-deep coverage. But every player asked from SU said there wasn’t déjà vu. Repeated answers of penalties ‘being a part of the game’ were spoken by Provo, Doug Hogue and Van Chew, amongst others. But with that, no one fully went into what it is about Maine that catches SU off guard. After all, Maine’s opponents only attained nine total penalties against the Black Bears prior to Saturday. Is it the much talked about trickery? Is it the fact that Maine is an FCS opponent? Chew said it came down to nervousness. But, what is there to be nervous about against Maine? Why Maine? Why the repeat performance? For SU’s leading tackler on the day in Derrell Smith, there really isn’t anything to look into with the penalty showing. It’s not déjà vu. It’s nothing about Maine. Unlike Provo, Smith didn’t need an awkward pause to supply his first answer. It was almost as if he had the succinct response dialed up before the question was finished. Penalties happen. And it’s mere coincidence. Said Smith: ‘What a coinky dink.’ aolivero@syr.edu            Published on September 18, 2010 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

EU calls for 40000 property auctions

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A compliance report by the EU commission calls for 40,000 property auctions to be helde each year for the next three years, as part of the ongoing greek bailout. The demand, made known earlier this week, was met with a strong – albeit unoficcial – statement of denial by the Greek Ministry of Finance. The auctions are part of an effort of the country’s four largest banks, which have been recapitalised three times, as part of the bailout program, to reduce a “mountain” of bad debt they hold in the form of non-performing loans (NPLs) in 2018. To do so, the systemic banks are planning about 10,000 foreclosures, a plan that does not seem viable, considering that only 30 electronic auctions had been made up to December, tallying up the total number of properties to 80 overall. So far, auctions have been stalled either by bureaucracy and a sluggish judicial system or by anti-austerity activists holding protests. This month alone, 500 auctions have been announced, but if the goal is to be met, the banks have to schedule up to 2,000 auctions. last_img read more