Air Force Reports Diverting 66 Million for PFASPFOA Contamination Cleanup

first_img ADC AUTHOR The Air Force has submitted a letter to Senate Democrats acknowledging it has diverted more than $66 million from other contamination remediation projects toward PFOA/PFOS cleanup, CQ reported Thursday.Sen. Thomas Carper (D-Del.), Environment and Public Works Committee ranking member, released the letter Thursday detailing that funds from fiscal 2018 and 2019 BRAC accounts were used to clean up sites contaminated by past use of PFAS-based firefighting foam, according to the report.The letter is in response to congressional Democrats’ pressure on the Pentagon to account for whether it has adequate dedicated funding to clean up the contaminants.Maureen Sullivan, the top DOD official leading the agency’s environmental cleanup, said in a March House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing that PFOA/PFOS contamination would cost “approximately $2 billion.”Carper and Sens. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) followed with a letter to acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan requesting details on its nationwide PFOA/PFOS clean-up plans, including “all diversions, or planned diversions” of funds intended for other cleanup projects. They said they had “been informed that in at least one instance, the United States Air Force has diverted funds intended for a site cleanup of non-PFAS contamination to PFAS-related cleanup efforts.”Ellen Lord, under secretary of Defense for acquisition and sustainment, replied June 5 that the “Air Force BRAC has diverted $66 million from non-PFOS/PFOA cleanup projects.”In a news release Thursday, Carper said Congress “needs to ensure that the Department of Defense has the resources needed to fully address” its “liabilities related to the DOD-related PFAS contamination in our communities.”Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Nick Ameenlast_img read more

ALERT Town Beach Is CLOSED For Swimming Due To High Bacteria Count

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Recreation Department has announced that Silver Lake is currently CLOSED for swimming due to a high bacteria count detected in this week’s water testing.“To minimize the risk of illness from contaminated water, beaches are required to be tested for “indicator” bacteria ― bacteria that indicate the presence of fecal contamination,” reads the announcement. “Silver Lake is tested for Enterococci or E. coli. We had an exceedance this week, therefore the Beach is closed for swimming until a re-sample tests clear.”This is the lake’s first closure of the season, and it comes at an inopportune time. The Wilmington Police Association’s Beach Day is scheduled for this Thursday, August 1, from 11am to 2pm, at Town Beach.“The Police Beach Day is STILL ON with games, activities, DJ and lunch, but no swimming,” Recreation Director Karen Campbell told Wilmington Apple. “The beach will be retested on Friday.”Silver Lake is tested every Tuesday during beach season. The Recreation Department received these results late on Wednesday afternoon.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related(GOOSE) POOP HAPPENS: Town Beach Has Successful Season Despite 16-Day Swimming Ban Due To High BacteriaIn “Government”VIDEO: Highlights From Wilmington Police Beach DayIn “Videos”UPDATE: Silver Lake Will Likely Be OK To Swim In Soon; Latest Tests Show ImprovementIn “Community”last_img read more

Warren Williamson among candidates at historic Native American presidential forum

first_img We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith Share This! By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Share This! By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity. Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — The largest presidential election forum focused on the concerns of Native Americans drew several leading Democratic presidential candidates in its first day, including Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.The Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum — named for the late Winnebago activist — is hosted by Native American voting rights group Four Directions and the Native Organizers Alliance.A panel of tribal leaders, tribal citizens and Native American youth presented questions to each of the presidential candidates who appeared Monday (Aug. 19) at the two-day forum. A total of 11 candidates are expected to attend the forum at the Orpheum Theater in Sioux City, Iowa, either in person or via video.O.J. Semans, co-executive director of Four Directions, introduced the forum as “Indian Country 101 for America,” which included discussions of issues informed by indigenous spirituality.Judith LeBlanc, director of the Native Organizers Alliance, referenced the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s action to stop construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota in her opening remarks. That action was sustained by a belief in the sacredness of the land and a spiritual responsibility to protect the water that ran through it.“We are moving on a continuum from protest to power,” LeBlanc said.“Standing Rock interrupted the narrative, and when we left Standing Rock, we went back to our cities and our reservations to organize.”RELATED: The ‘Splainer: The ‘spiritual battle’ over the Dakota Access pipelineWarren’s appearance at the forum was highly anticipated, in part because of controversy surrounding her claim to Cherokee ancestry. Cherokee writer and activist Rebecca Nagle and other activists have taken issue with the claim. Meanwhile, President Trump has regularly mocked Warren by referring to her as “Pocahontas” — a remark many indigenous people also see as racist.Warren appeared to address the controversy in her opening remarks.Sen. Elizabeth Warren appeared at the Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum at the Orpheum Theater in Sioux City, Iowa, on Aug. 19, 2019. Video screengrab“Like anyone who’s been honest with themselves, I know that I have made mistakes,” she said. “I am sorry for harm I have caused. I have listened and I have learned a lot, and I am grateful for the many conversations we have had together.”Warren was later pressed on pipelines that threaten sites indigenous people consider sacred.“I will revoke the permit for the pipelines,” she said to cheers and applause. “It shouldn’t have been granted in the first place.”She also insisted on the importance of tribal sovereignty.“Tribal governments are the ones who control what happens on tribal lands,” she said. “That’s what it means. A government-to-government relation.”RELATED: Denominations repent for Native American land grabsThe first question asked at the forum — to presidential candidate and spiritual author Marianne Williamson — referred to the Doctrine of Discovery, which gave theological justification to European conquest of Indigenous peoples and land.Williamson addressed the panel “in the spirit of prayerfulness that was already invoked at this event.”Her remarks addressing the United States’ history of unjust treatment of Native Americans also were couched in spiritual language, calling on the country to “atone” and “reconcile with a horrific chapter of our past.”When asked whether she would protect lands indigenous people deem sacred, the candidate insisted she “will not compromise” with corporations who unfairly encroach on such lands.“Their time is over,” she said.RELATED: The spiritual politics of presidential candidate Marianne WilliamsonPresidential candidates Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Montana Gov. Steve Bullock are also slated to address the forum on Monday.Sen. Bernie Sanders; former housing secretary Julián Castro; Navajo pastor, speaker and author Mark Charles; former Rep. John Delaney and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio are scheduled to speak Tuesday. Sen. Kamala Harris and former Rep. Joe Sestak reportedly are late additions to the line-up, according to Indian Country Today. As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Letter: Nationalism is anathema to Christian faith Catholicism Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts News By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Share This! By: Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins Jack Jenkins Jack Jenkins is a national reporter for RNS based in Washington, covering U.S. Catholics and the intersection of religion and politics.,Load Comments,Java still a no-no for Mormons despite fancy coffee names Tags2020 campaign 2020 election 2020 presidential election election 2020 Elizabeth Warren Frank LaMere Native American Presidential Forum homepage featured Marianne Williamson Native American spirituality politics Top Story,You may also like Jack Jenkins jackmjenkins By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites About the authorView All Posts Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more