RWC 2015: Which team has the world’s strongest scrum?

first_img TAGS: GeorgiaRomania It’s no surprise that the French league, which places such an emphasis on the scrum, has produced the vast majority of props in the best scrummaging teams.The problem France have found, and the accusation can also be levelled against Georgia and Romania, is that you need more than a scrum to win a rugby game. France and Romania prepare for a scrum We did not find out exactly how strong the French scrum is, with third choice tighthead Uini Atonio starting, and a back-row starting in the second row in Bernard Le Roux.Still, Romania, while not as renowned as their fellow Nations Cup side Georgia, provided a stern test, especially with the first scrum of the game, where they won a penalty with a dominant push.In Mihaita Lazar and Paulica Ion they have two hugely experienced props, both currently plying their trade in the Top 14.In fact that would appear to be the common theme when it comes to the dominant scrums in the competition. We’ll find out who the best team in the world are on October 31st, but the best scrum in the game might be known before then.New Zealand‘s Dane Coles said this week that he thinks Argentina have the best set-piece in the competition, but they will face a stiff test on Friday against Georgia.The Lelos built their upset win over Tonga on a dominant scrum, as well as the ferocious tackling of Mamuka Gorgodze and Viktor Kolelishvili.When it comes to props, arguably no team in the world has more depth at tighthead, where Davit Zirakashvili, Davit Kubriashvili and Levan Chilachava are all quality operators at scrum-time.Argentina can usually match them in that department, but with Juan Figallo and Matias Diaz injured, their reserve props aren’t as strong. That’s even more true on the loosehead side where Marcos Ayerza is outstanding, but with very little behind him.The other huge scrum battle took place when Romania took on France at the Olympic Stadium, with the Oaks trying to get one over on their Latin rivals. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Romania bossed France in a number of scrums in their opening World Cup game, but Argentina and Georgia run them close when it comes to strengthlast_img read more

Colds, Flu, Cough: When’s a sick child not too sick to…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Tips for working parents:If you’re a working parent, below are a few ideas to consider before your child becomes ill:Save some personal days: For days like these, the easiest way out is to use paid time off. Save a few extra hours for child emergencies. If your company doesn’t provide PTO, talk to your supervisor in advance about the best plan of action if your child wakes up sick.Have an emergency sitter list: Start a list of family, friends or care providers who could possibly be available at short notice. Keep their phone numbers and availability within reach.Watch for warning signs: Be aware of early warning signs in your child that could predict an oncoming illness. Does your child get a tickle in her throat or a headache? Recognize the signs and tend to these immediately to try to ward off illness.– See more  here. Please enter your comment! From Florida Hospital – ApopkaSometimes, it’s easy to figure out when your child is too sick to go school. With telltale signs like vomiting, a high fever, even pink eye, you know when to keep a little one home.But after you’ve both spent a restless night with a “scratchy” throat, hacking cough, a warm forehead or general malaise, parents of elementary school children may find themselves wondering whether their sick child is or isn’t too sick to send to school.While you don’t want to infect an entire classroom, there may be times when your child needs to head for the school bus. And, if you’re a working parent, you’re left to make a judgment call, which can be difficult.It’s a common question we hear and there’s a lot of gray area,” says Tad Nowicki, MD, pediatrician who practices at Florida Hospital. “Sometimes it’s hard for people to know what the right answer is.”Below Dr. Nowicki offers advice to help you make a stay-or-go decision before the start of the school day.ColdsCommon colds are the main reason children miss school and adults miss work. Each year in the United States, there are millions of cases of the common cold. Adults average of 2-3 colds per year, and children have even more says the National Institutes of Health.Colds are so common that if kids stayed home every time they had one they’d never graduate. Says Dr. Nowicki, make sure your child washes his or her hands and sneezes into an elbow or better yet, a tissue. Teach little ones to avoid sneezing into their hands because they’re likely to spread germs by touching something – like a doorknob, computer or a friend.Conjunctivitis a.k.a. Pink EyeIt’s the most common eye problem kids can have. Adults, especially parents and teachers who spend a lot of time with kids, can get it too. Pink eye is highly contagious and most cases are caused by a virus, which doesn’t respond to an antibiotic. Bacterial conjunctivitis requires an antibiotic; your doctor will be able to determine if this is the case.Conjunctivitis lasts a short time, usually about a week or less, and then goes away by itself or after treatment. Keep your child home until a doctor gives the OK to return to school.CoughsHaving a sore throat, cough or mild congestion doesn’t necessarily mean your child can’t be active and participatory. If your son has a stuffed-up nose but is still running around the house, chances are he’s well enough for the classroom. On the other hand, if he’s been coughing all night, or his cough is accompanied by phlegm, or he wakes up groggy, he may need to take it easy at home.FeverIt’s a parent’s call on fevers of 100 degrees. Fevers of 101 and higher, however, are usually a sign of illness. Keep him home and don’t be too quick to send him back as soon as he appears to rebound. Kids should be fever free without any medication for at least 24 hours before returning to school. Giving them acetaminophen to lower a fever and then sending them off to school isn’t right – for them, their teachers or their classmates.Flu“I tell parents to keep kids with flu-like symptoms home for at least 24 hours after they no longer have a fever, or signs of a fever, without the use of fever-reducing medicines,” says Dr. Nowicki.RashesRashes can be a sign of contagious illnesses like chickenpox, bacterial meningitis, or impetigo (a skin infection). Keep your child home until she’s been diagnosed. Even if the rash isn’t catchable, you’ll put other parents and teachers at ease if you get a doctor’s note confirming it isn’t contagious.Lack of EnergyKids who lose their appetite, are clingy or lethargic, complain of pain, or who just don’t seem to be acting like themselves should also take a sick day.Vomiting and DiarrheaKeep kids home for the duration of a gastrointestinal illness, and for at least an additional 24 hours. Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSFlorida Hospital – Apopka Previous articleHappy May Day!Next article5 unbelievably yummy, better-for-you breakfast ideas Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Anatomy of Fear last_img read more

Update to Code of Fundraising Practice to coincide with GDPR implementation

first_imgConsultation responsesThe Code changes have been published together with a summary of consultation responses received from data protection specialists, sector bodies, charities and the public between October and December 2017.Stephen Service, Policy Manager at the Fundraising Regulator said: “The Code’s message is clear: data protection is not an afterthought, but a starting point for good fundraising practice. It is more important than ever that fundraisers know the provenance of any personal data they hold and have a clear basis for processing it.” Howard Lake | 15 February 2018 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis46  155 total views,  1 views today The Fundraising Regulator has made changes to the Code of Fundraising Practice that take into account the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).The revised Code sets out the rules for fundraisers regarding the use of personal data.The changes are designed to:Ensure consistent terminology between the Code and GDPR;Emphasise that any activity involving personal data (including wealth screening, data matching, tele-appending and reuse of public information) falls under processing and that data protection rules apply;Create new sections on Data Protection and Direct Marketing;Add and expand definitions for key terms, including “processing”, “consent” and “legitimate Interest”;  Increase links to existing guidance from the ICO, the Fundraising Regulator and other relevant bodies.They are extensive, covering the following sections of the Code:1.0 Key Principles and Behaviours2.0 Working with Volunteers3.0 Working with Children4.0 Working with Third Parties 5.0 Personal Information and Fundraising6.0 Content of Fundraising Communications7.0 Mail8.0 Telephone9.0 Digital Media14.0 Fundraising through Payroll Giving15.0 Events16.0 Public Collections20.0 Handling of DonationsThe changes include the replacement of section 5 (Fundraising Communications and Techniques) with one on Personal Information and Fundraising.The Code changes can be reviewed now and come into effect on 25 May 2018 when the GDPR is incorporated into UK law.Suzanne McCarthy, Chair of the Fundraising Regulator’s Standards Committee said: “New data protection laws will take effect from 25th May 2018 and we know many charities are concerned about what this means for their fundraising. We hope that these updates to the Code will help fundraisers understand their responsibilities to members of the public when they use their personal data.”Further changes are possible when PECR is reviewed and the new Data Protection Bill is enacted, so the Regulator’s latest revisions to the Code highlight this areas.Dan Fluskey, Head of Policy at the IoF said: “As the deadline for GDPR gets ever closer, it’s really important that fundraisers can see how the Code of Fundraising Practice will change when it comes into effect. We know there has been uncertainty and confusion over recent months and hope that being able to see what the Code will include will help to give fundraisers reassurance and confidence in how they can communicate with supporters after May 25th.” Advertisement Tagged with: Code of Fundraising Practice data protection Fundraising Regulator GDPRcenter_img Changes announced to six areas of the Code of Fundraising Practice (2 August 2017)Dogs Trust breached Code of Fundraising Practice by calling TPS-registered individual (7 June 2016)  156 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis46 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Update to Code of Fundraising Practice to coincide with GDPR implementationlast_img read more

Telangana HC’s Powerful Decision On Right To Health In Times Like COVID-19

first_imgColumnsTelangana HC’s Powerful Decision On Right To Health In Times Like COVID-19 Swapnil Tripathi25 May 2020 4:39 AMShare This – xThe Court’s reiteration of its role of enforcing the protections under Article 21 even in times of an emergency is particularly important.The world is currently dealing with the unfortunate COVID crisis. Almost every government across the world has brought in radical measures to curb the transmission of cases and save its citizens from dying. The central and state governments in India have also done the same. The laws and regulations framed by the governments, to either keep COVID infections in check or to provide…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe world is currently dealing with the unfortunate COVID crisis. Almost every government across the world has brought in radical measures to curb the transmission of cases and save its citizens from dying. The central and state governments in India have also done the same. The laws and regulations framed by the governments, to either keep COVID infections in check or to provide services to the people, have been criticised for alleged violation of fundamental rights. More than the government, it is the judiciary that has been accused of abdicating its responsibility of protecting fundamental rights, so much so, that some have compared these times to the days of ADM Jabalpur. While I do not wish to comment on these allegations, there is a significant verdict of the High Court of Telangana (GantaJai Kumar v. State of Telangana and Ors., W.P. (PIL) 75 of 2020), which deserves praise. The Court here has strongly reiterated the principles of the Right to Life and the importance of this Right even during a crisis like the present one. In this post, I shall discuss the judgment and the key takeaways from it. Before I discuss the judgment, a brief overview of the legal provisions involved in it i.e. Article 21 of the Constitution and Section 2 of the Epidemic Diseases Act, 1897, would be helpful. Article 21 of the Constitution guarantees to every person in India (not just citizens) the Right to Life and Liberty. The Article states that the said right can be restricted only by a procedure established by law. The ‘law’ in question has to be just, fair and reasonable. It should be noted that judicial pronouncements have read the Article expansively to include the Right to Food, Right to Health, Right to Sleep, Right to Clean Environment etc. The Epidemic Diseases Act, 1897 (“Act”) is a short legislation that aims at preventing the spread of dangerous epidemic diseases. Section 2 of the Act allows the state government to prescribe temporary regulations during the time of an outbreak of a dangerous epidemic disease, if it believes that the ordinary provisions of law are insufficient for preventing the outbreak or spread of the disease. Facts and Issues- In the said case, the Petitioner filed a Public Interest Litigation (“PIL”) before the High Court challenging the order of the state government, according to which private hospitals and diagnostic centres (equipped with the necessary equipment and personnel, and willing) were not permitted to conduct diagnostic tests for the COVID-19 virus and admit patients for isolation and treatment (“Order”). The Petitioner had argued that Article 21 of the Constitution guarantees to every person the Right to Life which includes the Right to Choose her/his doctor and hospital. Therefore, the state cannot restrict this right in the guise of taking steps to prevent the spread of the pandemic. The Petitioner further contended that there is nothing in Section 2 of the Act which allows the government to issue a blanket prohibition on private institutions and hospitals from testing and treating the patients for Covid-19. The Petitioner had emphasised that there was a need to allow private hospitals to conduct the tests and treat the patients as the government facilities were inadequate, lacked hygiene and that methods of treatment adopted were very ordinary. The government had justified its Order stating that the prohibition did not violate the rights enshrined under Article 21, as it was a just, fair and reasonable procedure. The Court agreed with the Petitioner and held that the Act did not empower the government to pass the Order. Therefore, the prohibition on private hospitals and institutions was sans any valid law and it also violated the Right to Life and Choose/Choice of the people. The Court ultimately allowed private hospitals having the capacity for treatment /isolation as per the standard operating procedure/ guidelines to treat/isolate such patients. Key takeaways from the Judgment: The judgment has certain key takeaways that shall be very significant in similar matters in future. a.Maintainability of the Petition- A PIL is admissible only if (a) the petitioner has bona fide credentials, (b) the Court is prima facie satisfied over the correctness of its contents; (c) it has an element of substantial public interest involved; and (d) there is no personal gain or private motive behind it. I have argued previously, that Courts often ignore these guidelines and entertain PILs that do not confirm with them. The High Court in the present case, is an exception to this trend. In the present case, the government opposed the Petition stating that it did not disclose any public interest and was engineered by vested interests on behalf of the private hospitals. The Court outrightly rejected this contention. It held that the question of a citizen having the right to choose her/his doctor or hospitals, certainly involves public interest. Further, (akin to the Tripura High Court in another matter), the Court also remarked that the government cannot make bald allegations regarding the bona fides of the Petitioner without any basis. Such an approach is welcome for two reasons. First, the Court applied the test for admitting the PIL (which it should ideally do) and second, it did not allow the flimsy argument of lack of bona fides, without the Respondents (i.e. the government) tendering any proof. b.Right to Life includes Right to Choose medical care- The Court interpreted the Right to Health under Article 21 expansively to include within its ambit the Right to Choose one’s Medical Care. It held that the Right includes the freedom to get tested in a laboratory of one’s choice and the government cannot take that right away. It should be noted that nature of the disease in question (which is fatal), also played a role in the Court’s interpretation. The Court opined, ‘The State cannot incapacitate him by restricting his choice particularly when it comes to a disease which affects his life/health or that of his kith and kin.’ By adopting such an interpretation, the Court has not only reiterated that the State has a duty to secure the health of its citizens, but has also held that the citizens also have an individual right to a choice of medical treatment (i.e. the doctor and the hospital) and the state cannot restrict it without a valid law. c.The Limited Scope of the Epidemic Act- For restriction of a Right under Article 21, there must be a procedure prescribed by a law, which is just, fair and reasonable. The government contended that the Order in question, is a valid law for the purposes of Article 21, as it has been passed under Section 2 of the Act. The Court here analysed Section 2 of the Act, and held that there is nothing in the Section which can possibly empower the government to pass an Order preventing private hospitals from testing or treating COVID patients or suspects. It can be gleaned from the Court’s observations that the Section only allows the government to pass such temporary regulations which are reasonable in nature. The Court placed reliance on the guidelines issued by the Union Government for testing of COVID patients by private hospitals and laboratories, to reach this conclusion. It observed, “61. The Ministry Of Health and Family Welfare, Union of India and the ICMR cannot be said to have ignored these provisions of the Epidemic Diseases Act,1897 and this Court has good reason to believe that the Union of India and the ICMR did give due consideration to this provision of law while permitting testing and treatment of COVID-19 patients by private laboratories and hospitals.” Therefore, the Court concluded that the Order in question was not ‘law’ for the purposes of Article 21. It observed, “48. Thus, in the instant case the freedom of the citizen of the State to get tested in a laboratory of his choice or get treated in a private hospital of his choice is curtailed by the State without support of any “law”, much less a reasonable, fair and just law. It’s action is thus patently arbitrary and unreasonable and violates Art.21 of the Constitution of India and is unsustainable.” d.Observations on Inviolability of Article 21 during times of Emergency- During the course of the hearing, the learned Advocate General appearing for the Respondents contended that COVID-19 pandemic constitutes a state of emergency in the State and therefore, the drastic State action is justified. The Court rejected this contention remarking that there is no declared Emergency in India. It further observed, that even if there was, it would not be an excuse for the government to infringe the rights of an individual under Article 21. The Court traced the entire saga of the unfortunate judgment in ADM Jabalpur and KS Puttaswamy (where ADM was overruled) and observed that the Court has the power to see that even in times of emergency, the state acts in a fair, just and reasonable manner. The Court opined, “57… An emergency of any sort is not an excuse to trample on the rights under Art.21 and the Courts have the power to see that the State will act in a fair, just and reasonable manner even during emergencies. Whether the State has done so or not is judicially reviewable in the light of the law laid down by the Supreme Court.” Concluding Remarks- The High Court’s verdict is important for various reasons. However, the Court’s reiteration of its role of enforcing the protections under Article 21 even in times of an emergency is particularly important. Further, the decision is reasoned in its conclusions and allows private testing taking into account the policies of the government, making implementation not an issue. I would call this decision ‘bold’ also because the Court has not shied away from commenting upon the poor state of medical infrastructure in the country. The Court has observed, “72. The Covid-19 pandemic has exposed the poor medical infrastructure in the States where there are too few Hospitals/Primary Health centres, too few Doctors and nurses in Government sector, lack of medicines, and general poor-quality medical infrastructure with honourable exceptions. In fact, the long lockdown was imposed to ramp up the medical infrastructure – buy more medicines, create more isolation facilities, get more ventilators, import a lot of testing kits etc.” [Views are personal] ± The author is a lawyer practicing in New Delhi. The post was first published on his personal blog “The ‘Basic’ Structure”. Next Storylast_img read more

Allahabad High Court Disposes PIL For Protection Of Sanitation Workers Amid Covid-19 With Directions To Approach Govt Authorities

first_imgNews UpdatesAllahabad High Court Disposes PIL For Protection Of Sanitation Workers Amid Covid-19 With Directions To Approach Govt Authorities LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK9 Dec 2020 7:56 AMShare This – xThe Allahabad High Court on Monday refused to issue directions for protection of sanitation workers, said to be working not only colonies in different cities, but also the residential houses where COVID – 19 infected persons may be residing. A Division Bench comprising of Chief Justice Govind Mathur and Justice Piyush Agrawal disposed of the petition by keeping the Petitioner at…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Allahabad High Court on Monday refused to issue directions for protection of sanitation workers, said to be working not only colonies in different cities, but also the residential houses where COVID – 19 infected persons may be residing. A Division Bench comprising of Chief Justice Govind Mathur and Justice Piyush Agrawal disposed of the petition by keeping the Petitioner at liberty to approach the competent authorities of the Government of India as well as the State of Uttar Pradesh. The Petitioner had drawn the Court’s attention towards a technical brief issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), containing interim guidance relating to personal protection of Safai Karamcharies/ sanitation workers/ scavengers. It was urged that such workers need ‘complete protection’ as they are more likely to be exposed to Covid-19 virus. The Bench however noted that the Petitioner had proceeded on a ‘presumption’ that in the State of Uttar Pradesh, the protection suggested must have not been extended. Further, it observed that no details had been given about any sanitation worker who had been infected. Be that as it may, having considered the documents annexed with the writ petition and the guidelines prescribed by different bodies in relation to extension of protection to vulnerable persons, the Bench deemed it appropriate to dispose of the writ petition with liberty to the Petitioner to approach the competent authorities of the Government of India as well as the State of Uttar Pradesh for getting protection guidelines executed in accordance with the protocol introduced and the Statute & law, if any, applicable. It said, “The petitioner, if approaches the authorities concerned, the suggestions given shall be considered objectively”. Related News: Earlier this year, the Supreme Court also disposed of a PIL seeking directions to States, their municipal authorities and local self-government authorities to ensure protection of the right to life of safai karamcharis/sanitation workers who are essential service providers in wake of the national lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic. SC Records Centre’s Submission That WHO Guidelines On Sanitation Workers Are Being Followed; Disposes PIL The petition was disposed of after the Central Government assured that such persons were being provided PPE kits and that WHO guidelines were being ‘meticulously followed’. Case Title: Mukul Choudhary v. Union of India & Anr. Click Here To Download Order Read OrderNext Storylast_img read more

Some male staff at St Joseph’s refusing to participate in intimate care of female…

first_img Facebook It’s hoped that talks will take place tomorrow to address an issue with three staff members at St Joseph’s Hospital.The HSE has confirmed that a small number of male staff employed as Multi Task Attendants at the hospital have recently expressed objections to carrying out the full range of duties as set out in their contract of employment.It follows reports that three male staff were sent home for a time after refusing to participate at what they say was the intimate care of elderly female patients.This would have included being present while women were being showered.Two of the men have returned to work, but remains out.In its statement, the HSE says the it should be noted that these duties, which it describes as “common everyday practice and a fundamental element of the provision of client care”, are undertaken without difficulty or concern by male colleagues within St Joseph’s itself, within other Community Hospitals, and within the general acute hospital sector.The HSE statement concludes that local management and HR personnel continue to proactively engage with the staff involved and their trade union on a daily basis, as they try to reach a mutually acceptable position.Siptu have confirmed they are hoping that talks will take place tomorrow to resolve the outstanding issues.HSE Statement – Twitter By News Highland – April 12, 2018 Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic center_img Google+ Some male staff at St Joseph’s refusing to participate in intimate care of female patients Previous articleWilliam O’Connor guides Ireland to Centenary ShieldNext articleTanaiste to address business leaders in Derry later this month News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Homepage BannerNews DL Debate – 24/05/21 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

Lancashire estate agent faces social media storm over ‘dreadful’ tweets

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Lancashire estate agent faces social media storm over ‘dreadful’ tweets previous nextAgencies & PeopleLancashire estate agent faces social media storm over ‘dreadful’ tweetsGary Kay now faces possible police investigation after posting ‘obscene’ tweets mocking the death of footballer Emiliano Sala using an account linked to his business.Nigel Lewis29th April 201903,312 Views An estate agent in Lancashire has been banned from his football team’s home ground after posting an ‘obscene series of tweets’ about the death of Cardiff player Emiliano Sala from a Twitter account linked to his business.36-year-old Gary Kay, who runs an estate agency in Burnley, used his Twitter account following a match between Burnley FC and Cardiff FC to mock Sala’s death, saying “We all live in a Sala submarine…. the latest number 1 in Cardiff”.The 28-year-old Argentinian player died in January when the Piper PA-46 Malibu light aircraft he was travelling in crashed into the sea north of Guernsey, killing both him and the pilot.The comments enraged many on the social media platform including Welsh politician Neil McEvoy who said he had reported “this dreadful abuse” to the Football Association, and Kay was interviewed voluntarily by Lancashire police.Zero toleranceOfficials at Burnley FC, which is in the Premiership, have now said that Kay is banned from its Turf Moor ground (pictured, above) pending the outcome of the police investigation and that it had a “strict zero tolerance policy to any racial or discriminatory behaviour” by fans.Following the tweets, Kay subsequently said on Twitter that he regretted making the remarks, saying that: “I would like to take the opportunity to apologise unreservedly for any offence caused to Cardiff City, Cardiff City fans or anyone affected by the recent post yesterday on this profile”.Kay and his estate agency have now both deleted their Twitter accounts.burnley Cardiff twitter April 29, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Another Delay for OCHS Experiment Headed to Space

first_imgStudent scientists explaining their space experiment at a news conference in October 2014 include (from left) Dan Loggi, Lauren Bowersock, Alison Miles, Kaitland Wriggins, Mercy Griffith and Kristina Redmond.The Ocean City High School students who have been waiting to see their science experiment launched into space experienced another delay on Tuesday.Just 81 seconds from liftoff at dawn on Tuesday, the rocket launch was aborted due to a mechanical problem (read more from NASA).“The next available opportunity to launch to the station would be Friday, Jan. 9,” according to NASA.Ocean City High School seniors Lauren Bowersock, Kristina Redmond, Mercy Griffith, Daniel Loggi, Kaitland Wriggins and Alison Miles have seen several postponements as they wait for their zero-gravity experiment to be transported to the International Space Station (including the explosion of one unmanned rocket).The OCHS experiment is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiment Program (SSEP), a national program designed to inspire a new generation of scientists and engineers in the U.S. The Ocean City students competed against others nationwide for the opportunity to have their experiment conducted aboard the International Space Station.The Ocean City experiment analyzes the effect of microgravity on the attachment rate of E. coli bacteria to lettuce cells — information that would be practical if people ever tried to cultivate food during long periods of travel in space.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

Lettuce Offers Free Download Of Huge Content Bundle With Live Shows, Tracks And More

first_imgAnyone who’s heard Lettuce knows that the group is extra funky. Now, the band is bringing the funk to you with an exclusive BitTorrent partnership, as part of the new “Lettuce Live” series. The free download series will see Lettuce share some of their prized content, and the first edition features so many goodies. Live shows, compilations, an animated “Lettuce Medley” video series, four videos from Red Rocks, and footage from the band’s recently-released Let Us Play funkumentary are all included!You can watch the full Let Us Play film here.For fans of the Lettuce funk, do not sleep on tickets for the band’s inaugural festival, Fool’s Paradise. Held from April 1-2 in St. Augustine, FL, the festival will see Lettuce perform an original show as well as a collaborative performance with beloved saxophonist GRiZ. Other performers include Vulfpeck, Chris Robinson’s Soul Revue, Break Science, Nth Power, Goldfish, Fools for Funk and so many more! Tickets are available here.Read the band’s full statement about the new BitTorrent bundle below, and access the download here.We’re teaming up with BitTorrent to introduce the first installment of the “Lettuce Live” series. This Funk filled bundle is bursting at the seams with exclusive content including two full unreleased live shows from our recently completed Winter Tour, Whit’s Picks vol. 1 (10 hand picked tracks from 2015-16 selected by Whit Hawkins), the premiere of our animated “Lettuce Medley” video series (Chapter 1), 4 full song videos from our headlining performance at Red Rocks (2015), 4 clips and movie trailer from our newly released funkumentary “Let Us Play”, Lost in Flight: The Fly Outtakes, “Phyllis” (Music Video), and a 15% off coupon for our online merch store! Best of all the entire bundle is downloadable FREE OF CHARGE!“The “Lettuce Live” series is about spreading Lettuce Funk far and wide, and this BitTorrent bundle is only the beginning. We’ll be consistently releasing new recordings as well as back catalog gems complete with video footage and behind the scenes content. STAY TUNED! We’d also like to express our heartfelt appreciation to everyone who has supported Lettuce through the years, without you none of this could be possible. Lettuce Thank You!” -Lettucelast_img read more

The Werks Share Full Audio From Phish Afterparty At New York City’s The Cutting Room [Listen]

first_imgThe Werks was just one of the notable jam bands who kept the party going for energized music fans with a show at The Cutting Room in New York City following night one of Phish‘s recent Madison Square Garden run back on December 28th. The show was just one of local promoter CEG Presents‘ robust listing of Phish pre and post-show parties, which took place around the city surrounding the Vermont band’s NYE run at the midtown Manhattan arena. The Werks had the duty of keeping the party going well into the early hours of Saturday morning as the four-night run got off to a hot start on Friday. The band’s afterparty performance sounded so good, in fact, that The Werks shared the audio recording for their fans to enjoy.The 10-song performance from the Ohio-based jam favorites started with an energizing instrumental rendition of “Lights Out” off their 2017 Magic LP. Following a brief pause, the band continued in tearing right into a super-funky, 18-minute “Cloud Hopper” featuring some wonderful interplay between guitarist Chris Houser and keyboardist Dan Shaw. The show continued with the darker, ethereal “Moonset”, which transitioned into an equally cryptic cover of RJD2‘s “The Horror” before returning back to “Moonset”. The set carried on with “Stars Collide”, one of the band’s new singles which arrived back in the fall, and continued into another three-part, thirty-minute performance of “Rollin’” into “Mad World” and back into “Rollin’”. The show came to a satisfying end with “Hard To Find” from the band’s 2012 self-titled album, followed by the set-closing performance of “Flat Iron”.The full performance can be heard in the BandCamp player below.The Werks – The Cutting Room – 12/28/2018<a href=”http://thewerks.bandcamp.com/album/live-the-cutting-room-new-york-city-122818″>LIVE @ The Cutting Room &#8211; New York City 12.28.18 by The Werks</a>[Audio: The Werks]The band would go on to close out their year with shows in Washington, D.C., and Boston on December 29th and 31st, respectively. The rock quartet has the first few weeks of the new year off to rest before they begin their winter 2019 tour schedule starting with a show at Cosmic Charlie‘s in Lexington, Kentucky on January 17th. Fans can head over to the band’s website for a full listing of upcoming winter concerts and tickets.Setlist: The Werks | The Cutting Room | New York, NY | 12/28/2018Set: Lights Out, Cloud Hopper, Moonset > The Horror (RJD2 cover) > Moonset, Stars Collide, Rollin’ > Mad World > Rollin’, Hard To Find, Flat Ironlast_img read more