Fishing the North Coast: Halibut opener slowed by heavy currents

first_imgDespite some pretty tough fishing conditions, a good number of halibut were landed out of Eureka earlier this week. On Monday, only a couple boats made it across a very nasty bar. Gary Blasi of Full Throttle Sport Fishing and Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing each stuck it out and landed two and three halibut, respectively. A few more boats made it out on Tuesday, and most of them landed at least one halibut. “Conditions are definitely challenging right now — the current is absolutely …last_img

Antibiotic Resistance Is Ancient

first_imgAn isolated tribe in a remote place in Amazonia has antibiotic resistance genes in its gut bacteria.An icon of evolution is antibiotic resistance. Supposedly, after the introduction of antibiotics in the 20th century, bacteria “evolved” the ability to resist their toxic effects. Since some antibiotics are synthetic, and the body still develops resistance, the story is that evolution is quick to evolve resistance by natural selection.That story has undergone a challenge by a new study of a previously uncontacted group of Yanomami people in a remote region of Venezuela. Researchers gathered stool samples for study, and found that the people had a wider variety of gut biota than westerners. Among the bacteria were species that had antibiotic resistance genes—including the ability to fight synthetic antibiotics. This was reported by Science Magazine reporter Ann Gibbons, who said scientists find this troubling:The medical team’s interviews with these Yanomami villagers found they were never given drugs or exposed to food or water with antibiotics. Instead, Dantas suggests that the Yanomami gut bacteria have evolved an armory of methods to fight a wide range of toxins that threaten them—just as our ancestors and other primates have done to fight dangerous microbes. For example, the Yanomami bacteria may already have encountered toxins that occur naturally in their environment that are similar in molecular structure to modern antibiotics, but have yet to be discovered by scientists. Or, gut bacteria in humans have evolved a generalized mechanism for detecting certain features shared by all antibiotics—including the synthetic ones designed by scientists—and so can mount a defense against new threats.The discovery is troubling because it suggests that “antibiotic resistance is ancient, diverse, and astonishingly widespread in nature—including within our own bodies,” says anthropologist Christina Warinner of the University of Oklahoma in Norman, who is not a co-author. “Such findings and their implications explain why antibiotic resistance was so quick to develop after the introduction of therapeutic antibiotics, and why we today should be very concerned about the proper use and management of antibiotics in both clinical and agricultural contexts.”It’s still possible that the people are not as isolated as thought, since they obtained machetes, cans and T-shirts, Live Science says. If the conclusions of the researchers are valid, though, it undermines a claim for rapid evolution, and gives credence to the creationist counter-argument that resistance genes were already present in the bacteria and did not arise de novo. Nature‘s coverage said nothing about evolution.For decades, evolutionists have pointed to antibiotic resistance as proof of evolution in debates and articles. No wonder this is troubling. It’s also another instance of the facts forcing them to push the origin of things into the unobserved past.The warfare metaphor is misleading. Nature is full of pushes and pulls that usually provide balance (homeostasis). Bacteria are not the evildoers they are often portrayed to be; nor are antibiotics the good guys with the white hats. We couldn’t live without most bacteria. There’s more of them than our own cells inside our bodies. Most of what they do is beneficial for both them and us. We can envision our Creator providing balance in the beginning, but loosening that balance at the curse on sin, leading to sickness and death. He has also given mankind the brains to figure out how things work, so that we can attempt to restore the balance as far as possible.The contrast of the evolutionists’ mission with Jim Elliott’s mission is striking. Elliott and his colleagues went to remote Amazon tribes to win them to Christ; the biologists went to dig into their scat. For sure, some of them wished to help the tribes people with their diseases, particularly the children. But it’s apparent they also wanted to find evidence for evolution. The findings were contrary to their expectations.We’re not saying the missions are necessarily mutually exclusive. You can go to a tribe to help them spiritually and physically. Many missionaries, in fact, do that. There are terrific medical missionary teams around the world that build hospitals in foreign lands, ministering to the body and the spirit of the poor. Ministering to the spirit is a doorway to people’s minds as well as hearts, giving them the worldview tools to understand themselves and their world. That, in turn, can lead to better understanding of science and healthy living. If the motivation is to use people as guinea pigs for Darwin, though, that would indeed be troubling. (Visited 100 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ohio’s Crop Progress — April 10th, 2017

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest There were 0.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 9, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. A very wet week has kept producers out of the fields. There was a lot of rain in the beginning of the week followed by some snow on Thursday. The week ended with a warm weekend which helped dry some fields. Wheat remained in good condition, despite ponding and delays in top dressing.Read the full report here.last_img

Muriel strikes winning goal for FC Pune City

first_imgMumbai, Jun 29 (PTI) FC Pune City snatched a narrow 1-0 win over KSA Womens FC, Kolhapur, in their second Group B league match of the WIFA Womens Football Championship today. The star performer for the Pune outfit, which had lost to Aadhar Pratisthan, Mumbai, in their opening match, was Muriel Adam, who scored the all?important winning goal in the 33rd minute, to give team a crucial win and the full three points. In the second match of the day, Aadhar Pratisthan got the better of Tripude Sports Academy, Nagpur, by a comfortable 2-0 margin. After a barren first session, Priya Tiwari scored the first goal in the 43rd minute, while Malaika Chauhan doubled the lead with a strike in the first minute of additional period of the match. PTI SSR NPlast_img

10 months agoREVEALED: Mourinho has Man Utd pay-off settled

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say REVEALED: Mourinho has Man Utd pay-off settledby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJose Mourinho is free to negotiate his next job after being paid his compensation up front by Manchester United in December.The Daily Mail says United paid up Mourinho’s £15million compensation package immediately after he was sacked.The 55-year-old was dismissed on December 18 after two and a half seasons in charge.The fact that he received the pay-off on his departure from Old Trafford means he is free to return to management.A source said, “There are no issues over Jose’s contract with Manchester United. Everything has been sorted.”Jose is able to take on another job right now, but is in no rush. He is very relaxed about it and would be happy to wait until the end of the season if he needs to.” last_img read more

Agriculture Ministry to Increase Sorghum Cultivation

first_imgThe Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries is looking to identify more arable lands on which to cultivate sorghum, a crop currently being tested as a substitute grain for animal feed. This was disclosed by portfolio Minister, Hon. Roger Clarke, while speaking to journalists today (April 19), following the harvesting of a pilot sorghum crop in Hill Run, St. Catherine. The Caribbean Broilers (CB) Group undertook the test project at its facility, to grow sorghum locally for feedstock as a replacement for imported corn. The Minister noted that lands have already been identified at Amity Hall in St. Thomas at one of the nine agro parks being developed across the island, aimed at enhancing food security and cutting the country’s food import bill. He informed that the CB Group will be undertaking this planting exercise and that the land is currently being prepared. “We’re targeting in that agro park, some 1,700 acres. They (CB Group) are moving now to put in 800 (acres)…and we’re trying to identify more lands. They have asked for some 6,000 acres…so the sustainability is there and we are determined to put whatever idle lands we have into production,” the Minister said. Sorghum is a genus of numerous grass species, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are used as fodder plants.  The plants take three to four months to reach maturity and are cultivated in warm climates around the world. “We are not only dealing with sorghum. We are dealing with other crops. We are going to be doing probably over 600 acres of onions. We are already moving with Irish potatoes – a whole slew of things that we’re doing (to utilize arable lands),” Mr. Clarke said. The Minister said he is pleased with the impact that growing the sorghum locally “will have on our importing grains for our animal feed”. “This was just an experimental plot, but the yield has been significant in terms of international standards and it’s just the beginning. This is just a start. What (CB Group) has learnt here is what will help them to improve in production and productivity as we go along,” he stated. Manager, Corporate Affairs, CB Group, Dr. Keith Amiel, informed that 60 per cent of the corn that goes in feedstock is imported, hence the need to create a local substitute. “The idea is to try to see how much of what we’ve been importing we can produce locally….We are going to try to make use of the unused land…it would take us about 6,000 acres to produce 10 per cent of the (crop) locally and of course, we can go up to any amount using the land that’s available,” he said. Agriculture Consultant, Johnny Haer, noted that sorghum is a dry land crop that is grown all over the world, because of its hardiness in drought and dry weather. He pointed  out that this “is one of the reasons why we felt like it would do so good here in Jamaica…I don’t see why sorghum is not going to adapt very well to the Jamaican climate.” He noted that the crop harvested from the 300-acre plot, is estimated to “probably end up yielding…roughly 3,000 pounds per acre or 1.5 tonnes per acre.” CONTACT: ALECIA SMITH-EDWARDSlast_img read more

Big changes to Big Ten divisions

The Ohio State Buckeyes and Michigan Wolverines, two of college football’s fiercest rivals, could meet one another in the Big Ten Football Championship Game at the conclusion of the 2013 regular season. That will no longer be a possibility in 2014, when OSU and Michigan will be realigned to the same division of the Big Ten, according to a report from ESPN. ESPN reported that the conference plans to vote this week to approve a new divisional alignment when the conference expands to 14 teams from 12 in 2014, along with new division names and an expansion of the conference schedule. Under the reported alignment, the often-criticized Legends and Leaders division names will be replaced by geographic designations East and West. OSU and Michigan will both be placed in the East division along with Michigan State, Penn State, Indiana and the conference’s two new additions, Maryland and Rutgers. The West division will consist of Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Northwestern, Purdue and Wisconsin, according to the report. Brett McMurphy, one of the reporters who broke the story for ESPN, told The Lantern in an email that “it’s not surprising” the conference plans to change the names of its divisions because of negative feedback to those names. “(With) the fact you could split the league in half geographically, it was a fairly easy decision,” McMurphy said. “I think it’s a great long-term decision to split the divisions into East and West.” McMurphy said he does not believe rivalries or competitive balance played a role in the restructuring of the Big Ten but was simply based upon geography. “Some would argue that East is much stronger than West (in college football), but in all conferences one division is usually stronger than the other,” McMurphy said. During a February interview with The Lantern, OSU athletic director Gene Smith said there was a “real lean toward geography” in realigning the conference for 14 teams but added that both he and Michigan athletic director Dave Brandon thought it would be “beneficial to the conference” to have both teams in the same division. The Big Ten did not immediately respond to The Lantern’s request for comment. OSU football historian Jack Park said in February he thought it would be a positive for the Big Ten to have OSU and Michigan in the same division. “I really think it would be good to do that,” Park said. “I think you’re going to have enough balance with the other good teams that wouldn’t be a problem, although maybe some of the other teams that are in that particular division wouldn’t like that (playing in the same division as both OSU and Michigan).” Not all fans are in favor of OSU and Michigan being on the same side of the conference. “If we (OSU) had a chance to be in a (Big Ten) championship game against them, that would be probably the ultimate game,” said Alex Davidson, a second-year in agricultural engineering. ESPN also reports that the Big Ten plans to expand its conference football game schedule to nine games from eight, which would allow each team to play all six teams in its division plus three from the opposite division each year. Smith said in February that the conference was considering expansion to either a nine- or 10-game conference schedule, but a nine-game schedule was more realistic for the purposes of scheduling stronger non-conference opponents. “We have to have seven home games for our local budget, so there’s a management issue there if you go to 10,” Smith said. “Nine gives us that flexibility to do that, and schedule up, which is what we were doing. Under the proposed schedule expansion, Big Ten teams would alternate between playing five conference games at home and four conference games on the road, and five on the road and four at home, each year. By limiting the schedule expansion to only nine games, Big Ten teams can still schedule a non-conference game on the road in years when they have five conference games and still have seven home games. read more

Freewaylevel transit stations now open

first_img March 12, 2018 Updated: 1:48 PM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings Posted: March 12, 2018 Ed Lenderman Very cool. Freeway level bus stations in City Heights, bus stays on the freeway in dedicated lane, rather than having to exit to street to pickup passengers, much faster commute for everyone. pic.twitter.com/yiwymDX9rC— Ed Lenderman (@EdLendermanKUSI) March 12, 2018center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSan Diego’s first freeway-level transit stations are officially open for this morning’s commute. Thousands of MTS bus riders each day will use these two new state-of-the-art bus platforms on the SR-15 freeway.Rapid 235 already travels along the SR-15, but previously had to exit the freeway at both University Ave. and El Cajon Blvd. to drop off passengers, cross these major thoroughfares, pick-up new passengers and re-enter the freeway. With the opening of the two new “Centerline” transit stations, Rapid 235 now enters two transit stations directly from the SR 15 median for more efficient rider drop-off and pick-up.Added bonus! Rapid 235 passengers will enjoy 2.5 miles of traffic-free travel thanks to Centerline’s dedicated bus lanes along the SR-15KUSI’s Ed Lenderman was live in City Heights with the details. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Freeway-level transit stations now open Ed Lenderman, last_img read more

Air Force Reports Diverting 66 Million for PFASPFOA Contamination Cleanup

first_img ADC AUTHOR The Air Force has submitted a letter to Senate Democrats acknowledging it has diverted more than $66 million from other contamination remediation projects toward PFOA/PFOS cleanup, CQ reported Thursday.Sen. Thomas Carper (D-Del.), Environment and Public Works Committee ranking member, released the letter Thursday detailing that funds from fiscal 2018 and 2019 BRAC accounts were used to clean up sites contaminated by past use of PFAS-based firefighting foam, according to the report.The letter is in response to congressional Democrats’ pressure on the Pentagon to account for whether it has adequate dedicated funding to clean up the contaminants.Maureen Sullivan, the top DOD official leading the agency’s environmental cleanup, said in a March House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing that PFOA/PFOS contamination would cost “approximately $2 billion.”Carper and Sens. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) followed with a letter to acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan requesting details on its nationwide PFOA/PFOS clean-up plans, including “all diversions, or planned diversions” of funds intended for other cleanup projects. They said they had “been informed that in at least one instance, the United States Air Force has diverted funds intended for a site cleanup of non-PFAS contamination to PFAS-related cleanup efforts.”Ellen Lord, under secretary of Defense for acquisition and sustainment, replied June 5 that the “Air Force BRAC has diverted $66 million from non-PFOS/PFOA cleanup projects.”In a news release Thursday, Carper said Congress “needs to ensure that the Department of Defense has the resources needed to fully address” its “liabilities related to the DOD-related PFAS contamination in our communities.”Coast Guard photo by Chief Petty Officer Nick Ameenlast_img read more