Mark Noble urges West Ham United to manage games better

first_imgWest Ham United must learn to hold onto a lead if they are to climb up the Premier League standings, club captain Mark Noble said ahead of Saturday’s clash with Liverpool.Slaven Bilic’s side have recorded two wins in their opening 10 league games of the season and currently sit a point above the relegation zone in 16th place.They have lost five points from winning positions, allowing Southampton, Burnley and most recently Crystal Palace to score late goals, and Noble said such results could cost them in the long run.”You can’t make mistakes like we made at Crystal Palace in the Premier League and expect to win matches, so we really need to learn how to hold onto a lead because we’re really shooting ourselves in the foot,” the 30-year-old midfielder told the club’s website (www.whufc.com).”People talk about ‘managing the game’ and a lot of it is common sense. We need to be able to see the time out by slowing the play down and, in a way, get the opposition and their fans feeling anxious. I don’t think we have done that well enough this season.”Over the last two seasons, West Ham have lost just once in six meetings with Liverpool in all competitions but Noble said his team will have to be at their best to beat Juergen Klopp’s men at the London Stadium.”With where we are in the table and the fact we go into the final international break of the year after it, there is a massive motivation to win Saturday’s game,” Noble added.advertisement”Liverpool at home is a big game – it always is. We’re at home, we’ll have the crowd behind us and we’ve got to roll our sleeves up, look forward to the game and do the basics right.”last_img read more

Erase that year Family of injured Broncos player looks to better times

first_imgAIRDRIE, Alta. — Injured Humboldt Broncos hockey player Ryan Straschnitzki is keeping his dark side in check as he and his family celebrate their first Christmas since a bus crash last spring that left him partially paralyzed.It will also be their first away from their home in Airdrie, Alta.Straschnitzki, 19, was one of 13 survivors in the crash between the Broncos team bus and a semi-trailer in rural Saskatchewan. Sixteen people were killed.The family will be having Christmas at their home away from home — a hotel they’ve been living in for the last six months while their house is renovated to accommodate Straschnitzki’s wheelchair.“Should be a nice time,” he said after a recent physio session in Calgary. “Just hanging around the hotel with the family. Have a nice dinner. Open some gifts.”But Straschnitzki admits to having dark days as well.“It definitely comes out in times of frustration, but for the most part I like to keep it in me and just be that happy guy that everyone looks up to.”The positive veneer cracked recently when a van he was riding in was rear-ended by a truck and Straschnitzki was flung to the floor. It brought back traumatic memories.“It just happened out of nowhere like back in April,” he said. “I’m healthy now and nothing was badly damaged, so I’m just moving forward and keeping that positive attitude.”His parents recall receiving a frantic call from their son after the accident.“I think it was harder on us that night because he brought us right into that moment. He drew us in and we relived the way he lived it,” said his mother Michelle Straschnitzki.“It threw us for a loop, but he’s still being resilient. I know he’s sort of a hero to a lot of people and he’s definitely showed himself to have true grit.”She said it was a shock because her son had remained stoic since his accident.“I think he does that for us … He doesn’t talk to us too much about it, but I know he lives in his own head quite a bit.”For his father, Tom Straschnitzki, 2018 can’t end soon enough.“We can erase that year from most of our minds and then move forward to 2019 and 2020 and go from there.”Ryan Straschnitzki said he won’t be holding on to many memories of a tough year.“I’ll just focus on just the memories of the boys, and all the hockey memories I had growing up, and seeing the guys after the accident which was nice. Basically those are the only good memories.”He intends to continue his rehab in the coming year and pursue his dream to eventually play sledge hockey at the national level.“Growing up with hockey I wasn’t the most skilled out there. I wasn’t always the go-to guy, but I made sure I was one of the hardest working on and off the ice.”Christmas dinner is being provided by a local butcher and family members will be gathering at the hotel to help celebrate.“It’ll be a very odd Christmas. We’re trying to figure out how to make it as normal as possible but we’re all still pretty scattered,” said Michelle Straschnitzki.“It still doesn’t feel like Christmas and we’re trying to get into the spirit of things. We’re still not sure how we’re going to do Christmas morning, but we’ll figure it out.”— Follow @BillGraveland on TwitterBill Graveland, The Canadian Presslast_img read more