Antibiotic Resistance Is Ancient

first_imgAn isolated tribe in a remote place in Amazonia has antibiotic resistance genes in its gut bacteria.An icon of evolution is antibiotic resistance. Supposedly, after the introduction of antibiotics in the 20th century, bacteria “evolved” the ability to resist their toxic effects. Since some antibiotics are synthetic, and the body still develops resistance, the story is that evolution is quick to evolve resistance by natural selection.That story has undergone a challenge by a new study of a previously uncontacted group of Yanomami people in a remote region of Venezuela. Researchers gathered stool samples for study, and found that the people had a wider variety of gut biota than westerners. Among the bacteria were species that had antibiotic resistance genes—including the ability to fight synthetic antibiotics. This was reported by Science Magazine reporter Ann Gibbons, who said scientists find this troubling:The medical team’s interviews with these Yanomami villagers found they were never given drugs or exposed to food or water with antibiotics. Instead, Dantas suggests that the Yanomami gut bacteria have evolved an armory of methods to fight a wide range of toxins that threaten them—just as our ancestors and other primates have done to fight dangerous microbes. For example, the Yanomami bacteria may already have encountered toxins that occur naturally in their environment that are similar in molecular structure to modern antibiotics, but have yet to be discovered by scientists. Or, gut bacteria in humans have evolved a generalized mechanism for detecting certain features shared by all antibiotics—including the synthetic ones designed by scientists—and so can mount a defense against new threats.The discovery is troubling because it suggests that “antibiotic resistance is ancient, diverse, and astonishingly widespread in nature—including within our own bodies,” says anthropologist Christina Warinner of the University of Oklahoma in Norman, who is not a co-author. “Such findings and their implications explain why antibiotic resistance was so quick to develop after the introduction of therapeutic antibiotics, and why we today should be very concerned about the proper use and management of antibiotics in both clinical and agricultural contexts.”It’s still possible that the people are not as isolated as thought, since they obtained machetes, cans and T-shirts, Live Science says. If the conclusions of the researchers are valid, though, it undermines a claim for rapid evolution, and gives credence to the creationist counter-argument that resistance genes were already present in the bacteria and did not arise de novo. Nature‘s coverage said nothing about evolution.For decades, evolutionists have pointed to antibiotic resistance as proof of evolution in debates and articles. No wonder this is troubling. It’s also another instance of the facts forcing them to push the origin of things into the unobserved past.The warfare metaphor is misleading. Nature is full of pushes and pulls that usually provide balance (homeostasis). Bacteria are not the evildoers they are often portrayed to be; nor are antibiotics the good guys with the white hats. We couldn’t live without most bacteria. There’s more of them than our own cells inside our bodies. Most of what they do is beneficial for both them and us. We can envision our Creator providing balance in the beginning, but loosening that balance at the curse on sin, leading to sickness and death. He has also given mankind the brains to figure out how things work, so that we can attempt to restore the balance as far as possible.The contrast of the evolutionists’ mission with Jim Elliott’s mission is striking. Elliott and his colleagues went to remote Amazon tribes to win them to Christ; the biologists went to dig into their scat. For sure, some of them wished to help the tribes people with their diseases, particularly the children. But it’s apparent they also wanted to find evidence for evolution. The findings were contrary to their expectations.We’re not saying the missions are necessarily mutually exclusive. You can go to a tribe to help them spiritually and physically. Many missionaries, in fact, do that. There are terrific medical missionary teams around the world that build hospitals in foreign lands, ministering to the body and the spirit of the poor. Ministering to the spirit is a doorway to people’s minds as well as hearts, giving them the worldview tools to understand themselves and their world. That, in turn, can lead to better understanding of science and healthy living. If the motivation is to use people as guinea pigs for Darwin, though, that would indeed be troubling. (Visited 100 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Announcing the September ‘Featured Geocacher of the Month’

first_img SharePrint RelatedAnnouncing the October ‘Featured Geocacher of the Month’October 25, 2011In “Community”Announcing the September Featured Geocacher of the MonthOctober 3, 2012In “Community”Announcing the First ‘Geocacher of the Month’August 20, 2011In “Community” Congratulations to all the Featured Geocacher of the Month nominees for September. The geocaching community is comprised of inspirational individuals – who go above and beyond in geocaching innovation, creativity, respect for the environment and helpfulness. Each nominee should be congratulated as an exceptional geocacher and individual. We are proud that each of the cachers is part of our worldwide community.SuperGoober, Featured Geocacher of the MonthThe choice for the September Featured Geocacher of the Month was difficult. A panel of Lackeys, relying on voting and community comments, could ultimately choose only one.SuperGoober is the September Featured Geocacher of the Month. Dozens of geocachers wrote in to share stories about SuperGoober’s humble dedication to geocaching, geocachers and his local community. He has hosted and attended numerous events, led many geocachers on their first outings, and is involved in local geocaching organizations. According to one nominee, “Jeff is a model geocacher who all of us in the area and beyond can be proud of. He is always willing to lend advice/help to any cacher that approaches him or contacts him.”SuperGoober will receive a collectors Geocacher of the Month geocoin, along with a Geocacher of the Month hat and certificate acknowledging their contributions signed by the founders of Geocaching.com: Jeremy Irish, Bryan Roth and Elias Alvord.If you know an outstanding geocacher who should be considered for Geocacher of the Month, send an email to [email protected] Every nomination must meet the following requirements: Please include your name, the name of your nominee, their username, at least one picture of the nominee and description (in 500 or fewer words) explaining why he or she deserves to be the Geocacher of the Month. Please inform your nominee that you’ve submitted them for the award. Nominations for the October Geocacher of the Month must be received by October 3rd.Once we have received all of the nominations, we will choose the top candidates and post them on the Latitude 47 blog. You will then get a chance to champion your favorite. Our goal is to involve the entire geocaching community in this process so we might learn from each other.Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Peek into the Future of Content-Aware Filling with Adobe Cloak

first_imgAdobe offers a sneaks peek at its new Cloak technology to intelligently erase and replace content in your film or video edit.All images via Adobe.Adobe Max is here, and the film and video production world is trying to keep up with all the new announcements and updates to the cloud. However, for those in film and video production, one feature teased during Adobe Max’s Sneak Peek presentation stands out for its future-minded possibilities.Adobe Cloak promises to change how we edit with its “content aware fill” capabilities. If you’ve ever been working on an edit and become annoyed to find a boom mic hanging in a shot or a logo on a shirt you don’t want, this technology is for you.Content Aware FillWith Adobe Cloak, you can highlight specific elements in a shot and use the content-aware fill to remove and replace them by using the information around the elements to fill in what you’d see if the elements weren’t there. It’s essentially guessing and creating new information based on the footage around it — which it does quite superbly.Precise TrackingTechnically, this technology is nothing too new to working with images in say, Photoshop. You can always go frame by frame and replace elements you don’t like. However, until Cloak came along, there was no technology in place to help seam each individual frames’ corrections together with precise tracking of camera and subject movements.Replacing Unwanted AspectsFor the filmmaker, videographer, and content creator, this is truly a valuable tool that can help save a huge amount of time — or even entire shots and scenes. Based on some examples shared by Adobe’s research engineer Geoff Oxholm and discussed with Kumail Nanjiani, Cloak can pull off a variety of replacements.Brand logos or emblems.Boom mics.Dust on the lens.Light poles or other obstructions.Entire people or characters.Cloak is also perfect for 360-video when you have a tripod in all the shots — or even covering shadows from your drone. You can read more about Adobe Sneak Peeks on their website here, or check out our full coverage of the new updates to the cloud here.last_img read more

Gujrat in a new avatar

first_imgAt Shaam-e-Sarhad, resort in KutchIndia’s longest coastline, splendid beaches, shore temples and forts, the country’s first marine national park, Harappan citadels more than 4,000 years old, ancient Buddhist caves, last habitats of the Asiatic lion, bird sanctuaries, handlooms and handicrafts trails… sounds like a tourist paradise? Gujarat has every reason to feel like one though it has never been much on the radar of travellers, Indian or foreign, with the label of an industrial state with no real tourism initiatives worth talking or writing about.This looks set to change. The growing corporate lifestyle is beginning to reap a bumper crop of upmarket hotels and international restaurants, spas and golf courses, art galleries and cultural complexes. The change over the last five years is dramatic-a state where golf courses were restricted to army cantonments now has golf clubs, corporate golf courses and even golf housing complexes. The corporate groups too are investing in heritage restoration and handicraft promotion as part of their social responsibility.Craft meets contemporaryA rural artisan at Rann Riders finds a customerA classic example of this new trend in tourism is the HM Craft Park, which draws visitors to the village of Bhujodi near Bhuj. Designed to resemble a traditional village in Kutch, this sprawling complex is all about a maze of rooms where artisans practise their art. From carpenters to woodcarvers-who turn out perfectly proportioned miniature dhows and bullock carts-to blacksmiths creating metal bells, this craft park is a journey through the colourful repertoire of all that Gujarat has to offer to the lover of arts and handicrafts.Says Bhojraj Dhoriya, a weaver specialising in mashru, a combination of silk and cotton threads used to make a fabric, “Handicrafts have been part of the life and culture of Kutch for centuries… Thanks to corporate support and NGO intervention we have more platforms such as the HM Craft Park, the Crafts Resource Centre at Kukma, the outlets of NGOs like Shrujan, Qasab and Kala Raksha.” Even more emphatic is Samat Tej Singh, who weaves carpets, rugs and blankets from camel and goat hair. “As we live in villages like Kuran which are very close to the Indo-Pak border, artisan communities like ours can hardly hope to have visitors. These new initiatives have helped us to know our markets,” he adds.Rural livingA young member of a Kutchi tribeKutch is an example of a fast-changing Gujarat. Along the road from Anjar to Kandla are a string of sprawling resorts that offer 3-4 star facilities, plush rooms, conference halls, sports and recreational areas, and party lawns. These are often booked for weddings, receptions, parties and corporate events.Of greater interest to travellers is Shaam-e-Sarhad in Hodka, one of the villages in the Banni grassland region, known for its high concentration of craftswomen. The drive to Hodka from Bhuj goes through the grasslands where you can see men and boys herding camels, sheep, goat and other livestock. On the way you can visit villages like Sumrasar Shaikh and Bhirendaria for a glimpse of a variety of embroidery styles.You enter Shaam-e-Sarhad through a reception area decorated with handicrafts. The highlight here is the interpretation of the village architecture of Kutch in the form of cottages that resemble bhungas (roundhouses), complete with mud-plastered walls decorated with mirrors and finger paintings. Each cottage comes with a patio overlooking the countryside. The resort employs people from the village, trained in housekeeping and understanding modern guest requirements by hospitality professionals, with much of the revenue going for community welfare projects.Beaches go boldHM Craft Park at BhujodiBesides crafts-based tourism, Kutch has also signalled the birth of beach tourism in Gujarat with the resort in the palace estate of Mandvi. This palace estate, which has been the location for Bollywood blockbusters Lagaan and Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam, has the majestic Vijay Vilas Palace as its centrepiece and a privately-owned beach. The Maharao’s nephew has started a resort here that is themed on the Raj-era camps that were set up during hunts and weddings at princely states. The 10-tent cluster offers direct access to the beautiful private beach facing an unending view of the deep-blue Arabian Sea waters. Beachside amenities include a thatched-roof restaurant open on the sides where you can enjoy the meal while savouring the breeze and views of the sea.Hip AhmedabadA vintage car at the Auto World DastanWhile rural tourism has taken Kutch by storm the city of Ahmedabad has mushroomed malls, hotels, restaurants, sports and spa facilities over the last decade. Among the most recent additions to Ahmedabad’s list of attractions is the Auto World at Dastan, the private estate of art connoisseur and car collector Pranlal Bhogilal. As you get to the estate, which is about 20 minutes’ drive from the city’s airport, the first impression is of greenery. The museum has an open-sided pavilion dedicated to American cars from the Twenties and the Thirties while the larger pavilion after this has pre-World War models. A highlight of the collection is the large number of cars that Bhogilal has acquired from Maharajas and Nawabs that have beautifully finished custom coachwork, ornate and personalised interiors, and rich tapestries. This includes coach-built 1920s and ’30s Rolls Royce from the erstwhile princely states of Himachal, Rajasthan and Gujarat, and a superb Hispano Suiza from Alwar.There are also cars from wealthy families like a 1932 Rolls Royce 20/25 Sedanca Deville from the Jewish Gubbay family of Kolkata. Ulrich Schmid-Maybach visited the museum to see the 1937 six-cylinder Maybach SW38 designed by his grandfather Karl Maybach, and Christie’s international director rated the thematic display of the museum among the best he has ever seen.Another unique aspect of Ahmedabad is the Heritage Walk, which is perhaps the only walking tour in India that has operated successfully for a decade as a daily departure except on a few public holidays. The tour begins from the Swaminarayan Temple, near the railway station at Kalupur, and takes you through parts of the walled city that are not accessible by car. This is a good way to explore the old quarters called pols which comprise narrow lanes lined by three-storey havelis with ornate facades, wooden balconies, carved brackets and exquisitely carved doors. The walk ends at the Jamma Masjid, a 15th-century mosque in the Indo-Saracenic style with a fabulous arcaded facade and the prayer hall with rows of domes. The House of Mangaldas Girdhardas, a heritage hotel, offers audio-guided tours with an MP3.Golf greensThe 18-hole course at Kensville Golf and Country ClubFor those who want to stay in a golf resort the Kensville Golf and Country Club in Ahmedabad offers upmarket rooms done in pleasing colours and motifs that go with their location in a golf course. The 18-hole golf course has a Jeev Milkha Singh signature hole, rolling greens and water features, and flower beds. Kensville is a good base to visit Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary, which is about 15 km from the clubhouse.Wildlife watchAsiatic wild ass at Little Rann of KutchEven more interesting for birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts is the Wild Ass Sanctuary covering about 4,900 sq km of the Little Rann of Kutch and neighbouring villages in Surendranagar, Mehsana and Kutch districts. A vast expanse of salt-encrusted plains with patches of vegetation, the Little Rann is the abode of the highly endangered Indian wild ass, not seen elsewhere, besides the endangered Indian wolf, desert and Indian foxes, chinkara gazelle and a variety of bird species characteristic of scrubby desert habitat. There are wetlands here as well where you can see thousands of flamingos, hundreds of pelicans, massive flocks of cranes, and a variety of ducks.A good place to stay near the sanctuary is Rann Riders at Dasada, 90 km from Ahmedabad, which started as a small four-room camp and has grown over the last few years to become a sprawling resort. The owners maintain a fleet of open vehicles for the desert safaris in the sanctuary. A special feature of the resort is the area given over to artisans to exhibit their skills and sell their wares. You can watch weavers at work on rare weaves like ikat and tangaliya, Rabari women doing their distinctive style of embroidery, and the Mir girls making beaded bangles.Another wildlife reserve that has been getting much attention from resort owners recently is the Gir National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary, the last remaining habitat of the Asiatic lion. Gir also has a healthy population of leopard making it one of the best big cat sighting reserves in all of India.The Gir Birding Lodge has an enviable location in a fruit orchard at the very edge of the wildlife sanctuary with its mangoes, berries and stone fruits bringing in birds from the forests. The main lodge has the dining and sitting rooms overlooking a part of the sanctuary. Some guests have claimed to have sighted a lion or leopard over morning or afternoon tea on the balconies. Another good resort is the Lion Safari Camp, which has plush tented accommodations among palms and mango trees. A more contemporary-style resort at Gir is the Gir Jungle Lodge, which offers 36 rooms in a garden setting with a swimming pool, ayurvedic centre, spa and gym.With a successful blend of tradition and the modern, Gujarat, indeed, has reinvented itself in the last decade.advertisementadvertisementadvertisement Fact fileHM Craft Park Near Bhujodi Village (about 20 minutes drive from Bhuj Airport); tel (02832) 240 495/496; www.hmcraftpark.comShaam-e-Sarhad Hodka (about one hour drive from Bhuj airport); tel: (02803) 296 222; www.hodka.inBeach at Mandvi Palace Vijay Vilas Palace, Mandvi, Kutch; tel: (02834) 295 725; www.mandvibeach.comAuto World at Dastan Dastan Estate, Kathwada, Sardar Patel Ring Road, Ahmedabad; tel: (079) 2282 0699Heritage Walk in Ahmedabad Call CRUTA Foundation for bookings; tel: (079) 3982 4116, 2657 4335; timings: 8a.m. to 10.30a.m. dailyKensville Golf & Country Club Bavla-Nalsarovar road; tel: (079) 4000 2900, 2692 5729Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary 90 minutes from Ahmedabad via Sanand. Forest department office tel: 079 372 3500Rann Riders Dasada village, District Surendranagar; tel: (02757) 280 257; www.rannriders.comGir Birding Lodge At Bambaphor Gate, Sasan Gir; tel: (0)98240 72075; e-mail [email protected] Safari Camp Hirneshwar Temple, Village Balcheel, Sasan Gir; tel: (079) 4026 3333; e-mail: [email protected] Jungle Lodge Sasan-Junagadh Road, Sasan Gir; bookings tel: (011) 2585 4147last_img read more

German Grand Prix: Lewis Hamilton gets ‘miracle’ win, Vettel crashes out

first_imgLewis Hamilton won the German Grand Prix in what was a race for the ages as he put up a genius performance to go from 14th at the start to finishing first.At Hockenheim and in his rival Sebastian Vettel’s home race, Hamilton regained the Formula One Championship lead and now is on top of the table with 188 points compared to Vettel’s 171 points.Hamilton’s teammate Valtteri Bottas finished a Mercedes one-two and played the role of a perfect second driver as he finished second while Ferrari’s Kimi Raikkonen finished third in the race.It can be called a “miracle” race for Hamilton while a disastrous one for home hero Vettel, who started on the pole but crashed out in the 52nd lap.Utter heartbreak for Vettel at his home race #GermanGP #F1 pic.twitter.com/bTEgcUKoT7Formula 1 (@F1) July 22, 2018Vettel, who started the race with an eight-point lead over Hamilton, tried to take a turn but skidded into the barriers right in front of his home fans.Reigning world champion Hamilton took the chequered flag, for a record-equalling fourth German Grand Prix win and capped off with a dramatic dialogue to a super-dramatic race telling his team “love conquers all”.The clouds threatened to rain on his paradeBut there was a silver lining for @LewisHamilton in Germany #GermanGP #F1 pic.twitter.com/TFIxZNzPCIFormula 1 (@F1) July 22, 2018Just as Hamilton won the race, Mercedes said on the team radio, “Get in there, Lewis. Miracles do happen mate.” Hamilton responded with, “What an amazing job by you guys. Love conquers all.”advertisement”It’s obviously very difficult from that position and highly unlikely but you’ve got to believe. I did a long prayer before the race. I wanted to stay collected, stay calm. The team did such a great job today. I kept believing and it happened so I manifested my dream today. A big, big thanks to God.”Conditions were perfect for business time. When it rained, I knew I would have a good position.”You never knew what was going to happen after the safety car. I hope this solidifies their belief in me, and I hope this solidified my belief in them. For those who didn’t know me before, now you do,” Hamilton said after the match.Win number 44 driving car #44!#GermanGP #F1 pic.twitter.com/vpfmOqHlw9Formula 1 (@F1) July 22, 2018There was a point in the race when teammates Hamilton and Bottas were having a go at each other to take the first spot in the race but as soon as Hamilton raced ahead, Bottas was told on the team radio to hold position, basically not to overtake Hamilton, and all the man said was “okay.””As a driver a win is what we are after, when Seb went off I think there was a good chance.”Taking positives, as a team it is a perfect result for us.”We had a bit of a battle lap one after the safety car, I didn’t get past and I got told to minimise the risk but I understand,” Bottas said after the race.BOTTAS: “As a driver, winning is what we’re looking for. When Seb went off I thought there was a good chance… but as a team, it’s a perfect race for us” #GermanGP #F1 pic.twitter.com/WXB4KaAdwTFormula 1 (@F1) July 22, 2018Raikkonen, who finished third but was earlier asked to give way to Vettel, was livid during the race and said, “So you want me to… let him go? Please. Just tell me.””I think we have certain rules but it wasn’t clear enough. It was a moment in the race where I needed to stop.RAIKKONEN: “It was a tricky race with the rain and it was slippery out there. Not an easy race but I’ll take it today” #GermanGP #F1 pic.twitter.com/rdFYF60eEDFormula 1 (@F1) July 22, 2018″It didn’t really change an awful lot in the end. It was a tricky race. I had a problem with one of the lappers, the Sauber. It was a tricky race but we try next time,” Raikonnen spoke after the race.On how the Ferrari car reacted in the rain: “I don’t know. I only drive my car. In the past, it’s been difficult in the rain and I was surprised with how the grip reacted.(With Reuters inputs)last_img read more