Public appeal for missing Limerick woman

first_imgWATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick woman Lisa GalvinLimerick woman Lisa GalvinGARDAI in Limerick have issued an appeal and are seeking the assistance of the public in tracing the whereabouts of a Limerick woman missing since Tuesday morning.51-year-old Lisa Galvin was last seen on Tuesday morning at approximately 10.30am in the Glasgow Park area of Limerick.Lisa is described as being approximately 5’ 2’’ tall with short brown hair and green eyes.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up When last seen, Lisa was wearing a pink jacket, blue jeans and blue runners.Anyone who has seen Lisa or who can assist in locating her is asked to contact Roxboro Road Garda Station on 061-214340, The Garda Confidential Telephone Line 1800 666 111 or any Garda Station.UPDATE – Lisa has been found safe and well.Gardai say that no further assistance is required and have thanked the public for their help. Twitter Email Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Linkedin Facebook WhatsApp Printcenter_img Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Advertisement Previous articleSteamboat Music: Record Store Day – Saturday April 22Next articleO’Connell St works will not impact on businesses Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie NewsPublic appeal for missing Limerick womanBy Staff Reporter – April 19, 2017 583 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSfeaturedGardaílimerickLisa Galvinmissing Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live last_img read more

WMAW: “You’ve got to believe in what you do”

first_imgWrights Food Group chairman and CEO Peter Wright (centre) with awards host Ashley Roberts and James Fitch, bakery sales manager for UK & Ireland at ReiserSponsor’s comment:“We were impressed by the diversity of the Wrights Business, the pride and effort taken in producing consistent quality products in such a complex business and the commitment to carrying out every task in the right way. The quality of the Wrights team and leadership group is exemplary.”James Fitch, bakery sales manager for UK & Ireland, Reiser Peter Wright, boss of Wrights Food Group, on how the business was honoured to have been named Bakery Manufacturer of the Year at the 2019 Baking Industry Awards.“Being in the final three was an amazing feeling,” says Wrights Food Group chairman and CEO Peter Wright of his business being declared a finalist in the Bakery Manufacturer of the Year category at this year’s Baking Industry Awards.“We were up against two large and well-respected businesses, either of which would have been worthy winners. We’re very proud to have won, and the trophy has taken pride of place in our reception area,” he tells British Baker.Wright suggests what made his business stand out to the category judges was its story, growing from a family pie shop to the diverse food manufacturing operation it is today.He also believes the judges would have been surprised by the vast offering of Wrights Food Group, noting that often people think it still only makes pies.“We have a credible story to tell about our family business, our history and what we’ve built. We’re all very passionate ambassadors of the baking industry and I think that shone through,” he explains. “You’ve got to be passionate and believe in what you do, and everybody at Wrights is very proud of what we’ve achieved.”Wright and his senior team attended the awards and celebrated the win together. He then sent a personal letter to each employee, thanking them for their contribution in helping to achieve the accolade.“It’s down to everybody’s hard work and contribution. I have a responsibility in this company as the head of the business, but I can’t run it without the employees,” he says.To those looking to enter the Baking Industry Awards next year, Wright says be honest with your story. “You must have a credible story to tell. Whether a cake maker, a bread maker, or a pie maker, people are interested in hearing success stories.”He adds that Wrights is proud to inform its customers, and potential customers, that its has been awarded and recognised as one of the front-runners in the industry.Looking to the future, Wrights will aim to grow its business further afield.“We plan to continue geographical growth, diversification into new markets and potential acquisitions of bolt-on companies that share the same passion, drive and desire to succeed as we do,” Wright concludes.“It’s an exciting time.”last_img read more

Panel faults NIH risk assessment for Boston biodefense lab

first_img Klare Allen, a community organizer who has led opposition to the lab’s construction, told the Washington Post that she was pleased with the NRC’s findings. “The NRC pretty much confirmed everything we’ve been saying for the last 5 years,” she said. Dec 5, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Amid controversy around the construction of a biodefense laboratory in Boston, a project risk assessment from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is funding the lab, has been condemned as unsound by the National Research Council (NRC). An NRC committee was named to look into the NIH’s risk assessment of the biosafety level 4 lab, which will be located at Boston University, in response to a request from the state of Massachusetts, according to the NRC report. The state made the request after a court challenge invalidated the state’s finding that the NIH’s draft environmental impact report was adequate. See also: The NRC report will be among other public comments the NIH will review as it finalizes its risk analysis, according to a Nov 30 Washington Post report. The Post story, published Nov 30, said the lab is 70% complete. Federal officials have said that if they lose court battles over the lab, it will be used to study less dangerous pathogens, according to the story. Nov 29 NRC press release “Environmental justice communities are often faced with environmental stressors that wealthier communities do not face,” the committee wrote, adding that the South End neighborhood where the new lab is located could face extra health challenges if residents’ health is poor, public health services are lacking, or insects or rodents are common in the area. Besides voicing several detailed concerns about the NIH’s risk assessment methodology, the advisory committee said the agency’s report glossed over “environmental justice” issues related to the lab’s inner-city setting. Also, the committee faulted the NIH report for focusing mainly on a single individual or a small number of lab workers in analyzing the probability of a release of a lethal agent. The NIH should have included other possibilities, such as equipment failure, security breaches, and malevolent action, the report states.center_img “The NIH draft report has serious weaknesses, in particular regarding selection of pathogens and lack of transparency of the modeling, leading the committee to conclude that the draft is not sound and credible,” said NRC committee chairman John Ahearne, executive director emeritus of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, in the NRC press release. One of the advisory committee’s criticisms centers on the pathogens the NIH selected in the scenarios modeled and described in the risk assessment: Ebola hemorrhagic fever virus, monkeypox virus, Sabia hemorrhagic fever virus, and Rift Valley fever virus. The findings from the NRC, an arm of the National Academies, were released on Nov 29 in a 28-page report posted on the NRC’s Web site. The National Academies consist of four private, nonprofit, congressionally chartered institutions that advise the US government on science, technology, and health policy issues. After it lost the court challenge, the state asked the NIH to produce a risk assessment addressing additional worst-case scenarios, alternative sites for the lab, and mitigation issues in the event of a pathogen release from the lab. NRC report on NIH risk analysis of Boston BSL 4 laboratory “The committee acknowledges the need for biocontainment laboratories in the United States, including BSL 4 laboratories, and recognizes that BSL 4 laboratories are being operated in other major urban areas,” he wrote. In a letter to Massachusetts officials that accompanies the report, Ahearne emphasized that the report focuses only on the quality of the NIH risk assessment and shouldn’t be viewed as a statement about the risk of a biocontainment facility in Boston or any other city. The committee said that worst-case scenario planning should have involved agents, such as those that spread by aerosol droplets, that have higher person-to-person transmission rates than most of the agents the NIH included.last_img read more