Is the IAG share price a bargain?

first_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Enter Your Email Address Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Image source: Getty Images I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Is the IAG share price a bargain? Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee.center_img See all posts by Rupert Hargreaves The coronavirus crisis has shattered investor confidence, and many FTSE 100 stocks have plunged as a result. The IAG (LSE: IAG) share price has been hit harder than most.Shares in the airline group have slumped by around two-thirds since the beginning of the year. Following this decline, the IAG share price is now trading at one of its lowest levels in history, which makes the stock look cheap.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…But with the group facing a prolonged period of disruption, there could be further pain ahead for the business.Is the IAG share price a bargain?Owner of the British Airways, Iberia and Aer Lingus brands, IAG is one of the world’s largest airline groups.Before the coronavirus crisis, City analysts were expecting the business to earn nearly €3bn in profits this year, enough to support a €0.23 per share dividend and group growth plans.However, the company has now had to put these plans on ice. Last week, the organisation announced job cuts equivalent to 30% of its workforce after grounding 90% of its fleet in May and April, as well as cancelling it its final dividend.These actions should help the business weather the storm. It also has plenty of capital available to keep the lights on for the foreseeable future. At the end of the first quarter, IAG had total cash and financing facilities of €9.5bn.A long period of disruptionThe company is hunkering down for an extended period of disruption. Management believes passenger demand will not to return to 2019 levels for several years, which could weigh on the IAG share price.Other aircraft executives have the same opinion. And even when passenger demand does begin to grow again, analysts are expecting a wave of discounts. This will likely result in depressed profit margins for the industry for many years.Therefore, it’s unlikely IAG will return to 2019 levels of profitability for the next two or three years. With this being the case, investors should prepare for a long period of disruption and volatility in the IAG share price.Uncertainty prevailsAt this point, IAG appears to have plenty of funding available to keep the airline group ticking over until some normality returns.That suggests the business is unlikely to collapse. But it’s difficult to place a value on the IAG share price with losses set to continue. If the coronavirus crisis lasts for more than a year, the firm’s financial position could start to look shaky.From one perspective, however, the IAG share price does look cheap. It’s dealing at a price-to-book (P/B) value of 0.7. This implies the IAG share price offers a wide margin of safety at current levels.So, for bargain-seeking investors with a long-term outlook, now could be an excellent time to buy a share in this leading aviation business. However, it could be years before the IAG share price returns to its all-time high of 707p. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Rupert Hargreaves | Friday, 8th May, 2020 | More on: IAG Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

Cuban regime fears bloggers more than “traditional” dissidents

first_img October 15, 2020 Find out more December 29, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Cuban regime fears bloggers more than “traditional” dissidents News New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council RSF_en CubaAmericas Organisation News News Cuba and its Decree Law 370: annihilating freedom of expression on the Internet Newscenter_img Cables: 09HAVANA221, 10HAVANA9, 09HAVANA592According to US government cables leaked by WikiLeaks, American diplomats based in Havana believe that the Cuban regime fears the country’s bloggers much more than “traditional” dissidents.In a cable dated 15 April 2009, Jonathan Farrar of the US Interests Section in Havana said the dissident movement in Cuba has become as “old and as out of touch” with the lives of ordinary Cubans as the regime itself. “We see very little evidence that the mainline dissident organizations have much resonance among ordinary Cubans,” he wrote, adding that they nonetheless were the “conscience of Cuba” and deserved US support.In a cable sent on 20 December 2009, Farrar said the Cuban government saw bloggers as its “most serious challenge.” Referring to Cuba’s netizens as “a group that frustrates and scares the (government of Cuba) like no other,” he said their reporting of the arrests and mistreatment they underwent constituted a useful political tool. “The bloggers’ mushrooming international popularity and their ability to stay one tech-step ahead of the authorities are causing serious headaches in the regime,” Farrar wrote, adding: “We believe it is the younger generation of ‘non-traditional dissidents’ that is likely to have a greater long term impact on post-Castro Cuba.”Another cable noted: “Younger individuals, including bloggers, musicians, and performing and plastic artists do not belong to identifiable organizations, though they are much better at taking ‘rebellious’ stands with greater popular appeal.”Read the cables:http://www.wikileaks.ch/cable/2009/04/09HAVANA221.htmlhttp://www.wikileaks.ch/cable/2010/01/10HAVANA9.htmlhttp://www.wikileaks.ch/cable/2009/09/09HAVANA592.html RSF and Fundamedios welcome US asylum ruling in favor of Cuban journalist Serafin Moran Santiago May 6, 2020 Find out more CubaAmericas to go further Follow the news on Cuba Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts October 12, 2018 Find out morelast_img read more

Oxford’s Vice-Chancellor highest paid in UK

first_imgA statement from the Russell Group also gave a defence, stating, “In view of the ongoing financial challenges that universities are facing, many Vice-Chancellors agreed to only very modest increases, pay freezes, or even pay cuts in recent years. The average Russell Group Vice-Chancellor’s pay increase was lower than both UK inflation and the country’s average pay rise of 1.8%.”However many feel that for the Vice-Chancellor’s salary to have increased in light of the imminent rise in tuition fees and budget cuts across the education sector is an insensitive misjudgement. The average pay of a UK CEO amounts to just over £122,000, less than a third of the Vice-Chancellor’s salary. A third year student regarded this situation as “ridiculous.”However a university spokesperson responded, “According to most national league tables Oxford is the number one university in the UK. It makes a major contribution to the economic prosperity of the UK and the UK’s position in the world, as well as to tackling global challenges through its research.” He added, “Its research output is vast, it has an almost billion-pound-a-year turnover not including the colleges and OUP, and it has great institutional complexity. Its Vice-Chancellor’s salary reflects that.”Dr Wendy Piatt, Director General of the Russell Group, also defended the pay of Vice-Chancellors, commenting, “Russell Group Vice-Chancellors lead complex multi-million pound organisations that succeed on a global stage. First-rate leadership is crucial if our universities are to continue to excel in such a challenging economic climate.” She added, “That Russell Group universities still punch well above their weight on the international stage despite being under-resourced in comparison with their international competitors is in large part testimony to the quality of their leadership.”Comparisons have been made to the pay of the international counterparts of the Vice-Chancellor, since in the U.S. heads of institutions are frequently paid salaries that pass the $1 million (£650,000) mark. This has fuelled concerns that the rising pay-packets of university heads are an indication of the increasing commercialisation of the university sector.Meanwhile Sally Hunt, the General Secretary of the University and College Trade Union said that the findings meant the government’s crackdown on excessive executive pay should extend to universities. She called for increased transparency and accountability for salary levels. Hunt told Cherwell, “Vice-Chancellors improved pay and perks are bound to raise eyebrows, especially when university staff have taken a real-terms pay cut of 7% since 2009. Unless there is proper scrutiny of vice chancellors’ pay and perks then stories of unaccountable increases will continue to embarrass the sector at a time when it is suffering punitive financial cuts.”The main political parties are all vying to lead calls for a crackdown on executive pay, with David Cameron saying it made “people’s blood boil.” In light of this, many are calling for the pay of Vice Chancellors to be subject to similar scrutiny, with Ms. Hunt calling for employees and students of universities to be included on the remuneration boards that decide the pay of the Vice-Chancellor.The Vice-Chancellor’s pay is currently decided by an Independent Remuneration Council which includes academics as well as experts from outside the sector. It has been revealed that the Oxford University Vice Chancellor receives the highest salary of anyone with an equivalent position in the UK. Andrew Hamilton receives £424,000 in salary, benefits, and pension contributions. His Cambridge counterpart receives £258,000, while the typical teaching academic can expect to be paid £42,263 on average.The benefits that the Vice Chancellor is able to claim follow the university guidelines for all staff, although part of his total remuneration includes travel expenses to return to the US a certain number of times a year. He is also given health insurance and access to a driver “for work transport only”, although this staff member is not solely for Hamilton’s use.The Vice Chancellor is required to live in a University-owned residence due to his position. The University gave some justification, commenting that the residence was used professionally, allowing Hamilton to entertain guests. They added that the property was fully owned by the university, so they incurred no costs from this arrangement other than for the property’s general upkeep.The university stated there are no additional benefits other than these for the Vice Chancellor, who does not receive bonuses. Cherwell last year reported that the Director of Oxford University Endowment Management Ltd received a salary of £600,000 in 2010, making her the highest paid university administrator in the country. However in 2011 no member of university staff received a pay packet that exceeded £520,000. 65 members of staff are on a salary that exceeds that of the Prime Minister whereas last year more than 70 University officials earned more than Cameron’s £142,500. Andrew Hamilton receives £424,000 in salary, benefits, and pension contributions. His Cambridge counterpart receives £258,000, while the typical teaching academic can expect to be paid £42,263 on average.The benefits that the Vice-Chancellor is able to claim follow the university guidelines for all staff, although part of his total remuneration includes travel expenses to return to the US a certain number of times a year. He is also given health insurance and access to a driver “for work transport only”, although this staff member is not solely for Hamilton’s use.The Vice-Chancellor is required to live in a University-owned residence due to his position. The University gave some justification, commenting that the residence was used professionally, allowing Hamilton to entertain guests. They added that the property was fully owned by the university, so they incurred no costs from this arrangement other than for the property’s general upkeep.The university stated there are no additional benefits other than these for the Vice-Chancellor, who does not receive bonuses. Cherwell last year reported that the Director of Oxford University Endowment Management Ltd received a salary of £600,000 in 2010, making her the highest paid university administrator in the country. However in 2011 no member of university staff received a pay packet that exceeded £520,000.65 members of staff are on a salary that exceeds that of the Prime Minister whereas last year more than 70 University officials earned more than Cameron’s £142,500.Vice Chancellors of the elite Russell Group universities saw their pay packets increase by 0.4% last year, although Oxford University said that this rise was reflected in the salary of all staff and was well below the rate of inflation. The rate of inflation was 4.8% in November 2011.last_img read more