Krohne to partner with CiDRA on sales of SONARtrac system

first_imgCiDRA has entered into a strategic sales representative agreement with Krohne Australia. Under the terms of the agreement, Krohne will act as a sales representative of CiDRA’s SONARtrac array-based flow monitoring systems in Asia and the Pacific, outside of Japan. CiDRA’s patented SONARtrac® flow technology has established itself as a new class of industrial flowmeter, using measurement principles that are distinct from all other flowmeter technologies operating today and is ideally suited for measuring flow in difficult applications. The addition of CiDRA’s SONARtrac® line of systems will fit well with Krohne’s strong presence in instrumentation and automation systems, providing their customers with a robust, accurate and maintenance free volumetric flow solution. “CiDRA is pleased to expand our partnership with Krohne. SONARtrac’s proven application in resource industries such as mining, and the region’s tremendous growth, presents a strong opportunity to serve customers in Asia Pacific.” says Charlie Neagoy, Managing Director of Product Line with CiDRA.Patrick Matthews, Managing Director of Krohne Australia, adds: “The sales agreement with CiDRA is a strategic partnership of high importance for Krohne in Asia and the Pacific. We have already worked together for several years in applying SONARtrac technology to difficult minerals processing applications and based on this experience, we strongly believe that the combined knowledge in flow application of our two global companies will become a real success story across multiple industries.”Krohne is a full-service provider for process measuring technology for the measurement of flow, mass flow, level, pressure and temperature as well as analytical tasks. Founded in 1921 and headquartered in Duisburg, Germany, the company employs over 2,700 people all over the world and is present on all continents.last_img read more

Siltbuster in trial to treat South Crofty mine water

first_imgSiltbuster Process Solutions (SPS) is taking part in trials to show the treatability of the mine water from the closed tin mine at South Crofty in Cornwall. Once completed, the results will be used to show the viability of dewatering and the reopening of the mine. SPS has been asked to treat the mine water (which includes dissolved contaminates and metals in solution, principally iron) by reducing the metal content to allow safe discharge of the water to the nearby Red River. If successful, the trial will be an important next step in the reopening of the mine, for Strongbow Exploration Inc., which acquired it in July 2016.SPS is a recognised world authority in treating mine water. It has successfully completed many mine water treatment plants, designs and feasibility studies both the UK and worldwide in Greece, the Slovak Republic, France, Canada and Australia. These include Wheal Jane, Cornwall, UK, one of the largest active mine water treatment projects in the world, which over the last 14 years has involved treating over 100 million cubic metres of water. SPS also designed the Dawdon mine water treatment plant for the UK Coal Authority, which won the 2010 Eddie Award for the best water treatment plant in the UK. Earlier this year it finished a turnkey contract to design, construct and commission a water treatment system for Wolf Minerals’ new tungsten mine at the Drakelands Mine, near Plymouth in Devon, the 4th largest tungsten deposit in the world.Commenting on South Crofty, Chris Bullen, Technical Manager for Siltbuster Process Solutions said: “It is great to have been chosen to work on such an important and high profile project. We have a long history not only of working with mines but also of this region, we understand the local geology and have consulted heavily with the Strongbow team on the best way to dewater the mine. This initial trial phase is very important; it will not only show that the required environmental standards can be met, but will also demonstrate the viability of the whole mine.”At South Crofty the trial will see SPS’s High Density Sludge process treat 18 cubic metres per hour of mine water over the next two or three months. This will not only provide performance data to support Strongbow’s discharge consent permit application but will also be used in the design of the full-scale plant; if the trial is successful the company would like to scale things up, to treat and discharge up to 25,000 cubic metres of mine water per day. This will enable the mine to be dewatered over an 18-24 month period ahead of reopening.The South Crofty tin project area covers 1,490 hectares, and includes 26 former producing mines. Production records for the site date back to 1592 with full scale mining activities commencing in the middle of the 17th Century. The mine closed because of the tin price, which collapsed in 1985.last_img read more