‘Climb’ Mount Everest All Day and Glamp All Night with 29029

first_img Editors’ Recommendations The Best Men’s Waterproof Boots for Tackling All Weather We can’t all be like Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norway, the first men to successfully summit Everest, or Erik Weihenmayer, the first blind climber to reach the proverbial top of the world. However, if you’re willing to shell out a few bucks, you can conquer your very own Everest, then sip fancy cocktails by the fire and listen to great music in the evening afterward.In 2019, all you need to do to “climb” Mount Everest is sign up for an adventure care of 29029, grab some hiking boots or trail runners, and head to Utah in August or Vermont in October. Here’s the short story right from the folks who merge extreme elevation gain with elevated lifestyle camping:“We rent a private mountain. We build a base camp village with bands, bonfires, luxury tipi tents, food, and drink. You join a community of like-minded individuals while tackling an epic endurance challenge. It’s a new category of events. Equal parts physical, mental, and spiritual.”“It’s a new category of events. Equal parts physical, mental, and spiritual.”A 29029 event merges grueling physical exertion backed by an iron will with the ultimate glamping experience. If successful, you will end your stay at a 29029 weekend having climbed more than 29,029 vertical feet (albeit not at once and with some down climbing in there, too), the equivalent of an ascent of Mount Everest. At the Utah 29029 event in August 2019, the group has planned a 2.3-mile long hike up Summit Snowbasin that involves 2,310 feet of vertical gain with each completion. After 13 treks up Summit Snowbasin, you’ve achieved the equivalent of Everest. In Vermont, the October 2019 event takes place on Stratton Mountain. Seventeen completions of the 1.3-mile, 1,750 vertical hike equal the Himalayan heavy-hitter.Here’s a secret: You don’t have to actually climb Summit Snowbasin or Stratton 13 or 17 times, respectively, to enjoy a 29029 weekend. If you pay your dues, the organizers still welcome you into the fold, which includes three nights in a luxury glamping tent, all the food and beverage you want, massage sessions after your hike, coaching calls leading up to the event, access to the private mountain (of course), and lots of neat swag.Good stuff, right? Well, it better be. Single entry to a 2019 29029 event costs $3,395; reserving a tent for two will set you back $10,495.So, do you have what it takes to climb Mount Everest? If you’ve got about four grand to spend on an experience of a lifetime … then yes, yes you do.While we’re on the topic of Everest, here’s a fun little fact for you: The first team of surveyors to measure the mountain’s height came back with an exact measurement of 29,000 feet. While precise based on calculations at the time, the surveyors added a few feet to make the height seem more plausible. While slowly rising, gaining about a half inch each year, for now, 29,029 is the generally accepted height of the world’s tallest peak. All 21 Six Flags Parks in the U.S., Ranked Zach Klein Is the Reason We’re All Obsessed with Cabin Porn A Breakdown of All the Major Types of Car Racing The Best Wetsuits to Keep You in the Water All Year Long last_img read more

Cleveland Browns owner says truck stop company owned by his family subject

by Erik Schelzig And Adrian Sainz, The Associated Press Posted Apr 16, 2013 4:03 pm MDT Cleveland Browns owner says truck stop company owned by his family subject of criminal probe NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam said Tuesday the federal government has launched a criminal investigation into rebates offered by the truck stop chain owned by his family, including his brother, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.Agents from the FBI and Internal Revenue Service raided the Pilot Flying J headquarters in Knoxville on Monday.Jimmy Haslam, who is the CEO of Pilot Flying J, held a news conference in Knoxville to confirm the investigation is criminal, rather than civil, in nature.“We don’t know a lot. It appears to be centred on a very insufficient number of customers and the application of rebates, that rebates that were owed to the customers were not paid. We of course disagree with that,” the CEO said.Haslam said subpoenas had been issued to several members of his 23-person sales force, though he said he was unable to identify any specifically. Haslam said he had not been subpoenaed, and no one has been arrested.Bill Killian, the U.S. Attorney in Knoxville, told The Associated Press that four search warrants have been served on Pilot, but the reasons have been sealed by a federal court.FBI and Internal Revenue Service agents locked down the Pilot Flying J headquarters Monday afternoon and ordered most employees out of the building as they conducted their search well past midnight.Haslam said essential personnel were allowed to remain in the building to ensure the company’s nearly 500 truck stops had sufficient fuel supplies. It was unclear why the IRS was involved in the raid, he said.“It does not involve, as best we can tell — and I’m pretty sure we’re right — any type of tax issue,” he said. “So there’s no evasion of tax or federal taxes, which candidly is what your suppliers, particularly fuel suppliers, worry about.”Haslam said that the company is launching an internal investigation, and that his responsibilities as owner of the Browns won’t affected. He said he plans to travel to Cleveland this week and next as the team prepares for the NFL draft.“First of all I apologize, because the last thing we ever want to do is put any kind of blemish on the city of Cleveland — which we’ve grown to love — or the Browns,” he said. “So I personally feel bad about that, even though I don’t think we’ve done anything wrong.”Earlier Tuesday, the Republican governor made an impromptu visit to the press suite in the legislative office complex in Nashville to discuss the raid. He said that he had not been contacted by federal authorities and that he was going to concentrate on “being governor and doing things I can control.”Bill Haslam said he has not had an active day-to-day management role in the company in 15 years. He defended keeping his unspecified holdings in the privately owned company outside of a blind trust he established for his other investments after he was elected governor in 2010.“The point of a blind trust is to say, I don’t know that I own that,” Haslam said. “As I said at the time, it felt a little disingenuous to say I don’t know if I own Pilot or not.”Haslam has refused to divulge how much money he earns from his stake in Pilot, which had $29 billion in revenues in 2012. He has argued that releasing his Pilot earnings would reveal personal information about the income of family members not running for office and proprietary information.The Haslam brothers are supporters of the University of Tennessee, where their father, Jim Haslam, played tackle on the 1951 national championship football team under Gen. Robert R. Neyland, who built the Volunteers into a football powerhouse.The elder Haslam founded the Pilot Corp. in 1958 with a single gas station in Gate City, Va. He credits his sons with expanding the chain from mostly gas stations and convenience stores to a “travel centre” concept featuring branded fast food service.Bill Haslam acknowledged that the federal raids were worrisome.“That’s a business that obviously my family is involved in, people I care a lot about,” Haslam said. “And to say, ‘Oh, it doesn’t feel like a big deal,’ is wrong.”___Sainz reported from Memphis and AP Sports Writer Steve Megargee contributed from Knoxville. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more